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Cimaron - Northwestern Pacific
July 18, 2013

NASA's Two Views of Tropical Storm Cimaron Making Landfall in China[image-110]

Looking at the extent of a tropical cyclone's clouds from space doesn't tell you all you need to know about a storm, so satellites use infrared, microwave and multi-spectral imagery to look "under the hood." Two NASA satellites provided an outside and inside look at Tropical Storm Cimaron as it was starting to make landfall in China.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Cimaron on July 17 at 17:29 UTC (1:29 p.m. EDT). Infrared data helps determine temperature, such as the cloud top and sea surface temperatures. AIRS data revealed that Cimaron's strongest storms and heaviest rains were east of the center and had cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C and stretched from northern Luzon, Philippines to the southern tip of Taiwan at the time Aqua passed overhead. 

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Cimaron over Taiwan and China on July 18 at 02:55 UTC (7/17 at 10:55 p.m. EDT). Cimaron's western edge had already reached the coast of southeastern China (where it is expected to make landfall).Most of the heaviest thunderstorms at the time Terra passed overhead were over the South China Sea. The visible MODIS image also showed that Cimaron appears more disorganized than it was the day before. There appear to be four areas of strong thunderstorms, fragmented around the center of circulation. The strongest storms were in Cimaron's eastern quadrant.[image-126]

On July 17 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Cimaron's maximum sustained winds dropped to 35 knots (40 mph/64.8 kph). Cimaron's center was just off the coast of southeastern China, and its center was poised for landfall. The storm's center was located near 24.0 north latitude and 116.9 east longitude, about 176 nautical miles (202 miles/ 326 km) east-northeast of Hong Kong. Cimaron was moving to the northwest at 6 knots (7 mph/11.1 kph).

 At that time, radar from Shantou, China showed shallow rainbands wrapping into a well-defined center. At that time, Shantou was just 15 nautical miles (17.2 miles/27.7 km) west-southwest of Cimaron's center of circulation.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final bulletin on the storm, and noted that Cimaron is expected to quickly dissipate inland.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 


 

July 17, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Cimaron Pass Between Taiwan and the Philippines[image-78]

Tropical Depression 08W strengthened into a tropical storm and was renamed Cimaron by the morning of July 17. NASA’s Aqua satellite captured the storm is it passed between the northern Philippines and Taiwan.

On July 17 at 0900 UTC, Tropical Storm Cimaron was located about 294 nautical miles (338.3 miles/544.5 km) north of Manila, Philippines, near 19.9 north latitude and 120.8 east longitude. Cimaron’s maximum sustained winds increased to 35 knots (40 mph/64 kph) and the tropical storm is moving to the northwest at 18 knots (20.7 mph/33.3 kph). Cimaron is generating 14 foot-high (4.2 meter-high) waves in the South China Sea between southern Taiwan and the northern Philippines.  

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect Cimaron to continue tracking to the northwest and make landfall in southeastern China on July 18.[image-94]

Animated multispectral satellite imagery indicated that the banding of thunderstorms around the center have been improving and have been wrapping more tightly into the center in the morning hours of July 17. The center is becoming more organized, as is evident in visible imagery taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite. MODIS captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Cimaron passing between Taiwan and the Philippines on July 17 at 0522 UTC (1:22 a.m. EDT).

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard AIRS showed the southern quadrant of Cimaron skirting northern Luzon. The strongest thunderstorms, however, remained over the South China Sea.

Cimaron quickly tracked across the northeastern tip of Luzon, Philippines early on July 17 and is forecast to make landfall in eastern China approximately 200 nautical miles (230 miles/370 km) northeast of Hong Kong.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


July 16, 2013 - NASA Sees Newborn Tropical Depression 08W in Infrared [image-51]

Infrared satellite data helps identify cloud top and sea-surface temperatures, and the AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured those when it flew over Tropical Depression 08W in the western North Pacific Ocean. Tropical Depression 08W formed east of the Philippines.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument took an image of 08W on July 16 at 04:35 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT). The AIRS infrared image showed a large area of strong thunderstorms appeared mostly east of the center of 08W’s circulation. Those thunderstorms had cloud top temperatures near 210 K (-81.6 F/-63.1 C). Despite the flaring convection (rising air that form the thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone), the low-level circulation center appeared to be struggling to organize.

AIRS data also showed sea surface temperatures near 300 K (80.3 F/26.8C) in the vicinity of Tropical Depression 08W. Those temperatures are warm enough to support the depression and help it intensify.

On July 16, warnings were in effect as Tropical Depression 08W approached the northern Philippines. The Philippines' public storm warning signal #1 is in effect for the Luzon provinces of Aurora, Quirino, Isabela, Ifugao, Mt. Province, Abra, Kalinga, Apayao, Ilocos Norte and Sur, Cagayan, Calayan and Babuyan Group of Islands and Batanes Group of Islands.        

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on July 16, Tropical depression 08W, known in the Philippines as “Isang,” had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). 08W’s center was located near 16.8 north latitude and 123.3 east longitude, or 182 miles east-northeast of Manila, Philippines. Tropical Depression 08W is moving to the northwest at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph). 

08W is expected to intensify into a tropical storm and track to the northwest, through the Strait of Luzon. The depression is expected to graze the northernmost Philippines, track just west of Taiwan and move northward over southeastern China before turning into the Yellow Sea. The depression will bring heavy rains and gusty winds to all of those areas and residents should be on guard for flooding.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
TD 08W
NASA’s AIRS infrared data showed a large area of strong thunderstorms mostly east of the center of 08W’s circulation. Those thunderstorms had cloud top temperatures near -81.6 F.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-51]
MODIS image of Cimaron
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this visible (color-enhanced) image of Tropical Storm Cimaron passing between Taiwan and the Philippines on July 17 at 0522 UTC (1:22 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
Image Token: 
[image-78]
TRMM image of Cimaron
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Cimaron passing between Taiwan and the Philippines on July 17 at 0517 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
Image Token: 
[image-94]
MODIS Cimaron
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Cimaron over Taiwan and China on July 18 at 02:55 UTC (7/17 at 10:55 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-110]
AIRS image of Cimaron
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Cimaron on July 17 at 17:29 UTC (1:29 p.m. EDT). Strongest storms and heaviest rains are east of the center (in purple) with cloud top temperatures near -63F/-52C.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-126]
Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner