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Chantal (Atlantic Ocean)
July 12, 2013

Satellite Views Chantal’s Remnants over Bahamas[image-202]

NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite spotted the remnant clouds and showers from former Tropical Storm Chantal lingering over the Bahamas on July 12. Chantal’s chances for regeneration are diminishing because of upper-level winds.

A visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite at 9:45 a.m. EDT on July 12, 2013 showed Chantal’s remnant clouds and showers moving north in the Atlantic. The image of Chantal’s remnants resembled the sideways view of a jellyfish. The GOES image was created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that the remnants remain disorganized, and that development has become less likely. Upper-level winds helped cause the demise of the tropical cyclone and continue to affect the storm. On July 13 at 8 a.m. EDT, the NHC gave Chantal’s remnants a 10 percent change of regenerating into a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours. In fact, the NHC even canceled the Air Force reconnaissance mission scheduled for July 13.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


July 11, 2013 - NASA Sees Chantal Weaken to a Remnant

Tropical Storm Chantal moved over Hispaniola on July 10 when NASA’s Terra satellite passed overhead from space, and less than twenty-four hours later the storm weakened to a remnant low pressure area.[image-170]

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a visible image of Chantal when it was a tropical storm over Hispaniola on July 10 at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT). At that time, Chantal’s northern quadrant covered the Dominican Republic and eastern Haiti while the center of the storm remained south of Hispaniola.

Tropical Storm Chantal ran into some strong upper-level winds that tore the storm apart. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued the final bulletin on Chantal on July 10 at 2100 UTC (5 p.m. EDT). At that time it was considered a remnant low pressure area with maximum sustained winds near 40 knots. Tropical-storm-force winds were occurring over a large area south of Hispaniola. It was centered near 16.5 north latitude and 73.7 west longitude, about 230 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica and moving to the west at 25 knots. All warnings were cancelled.[image-186]

NHC noted that Chantal was no longer considered a tropical cyclone and that its remnants would bring rainfall totals between 3 and 6 inches to Hispaniola, Jamaica, central and eastern Cuba as well as the southeastern Bahamas.

On July 11, the remnant low and its associated showers and thunderstorms stretched from Hispaniola northward to the southeastern and central Bahamas and the adjacent Atlantic waters. Some heavy rains and gusty winds were expected to spread over the southeastern and central Bahamas today, July 11, and Friday, July 12, according to NHC.

NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite has been capturing images of Chantal’s demise. NASA’s GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created an image on July 11 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) that showed showers and thunderstorms associated with the low stretched from Hispaniola north into the Bahamas. There was also another area of thunderstorms over eastern Cuba.

Because the upper-level winds are still strong, the NHC noted that there are no signs of regeneration and the forecast calls for the winds to remain hostile for significant development. So, NHC has given Chantal’s remnants just a 20 percent of becoming a tropical cyclone again over the next 48 hours.  

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


July 10, 2013 - Tropical Storm Chantal Enters the Eastern Caribbean

NASA's TRMM and Terra satellites provided a look at Tropical Storm Chantal's cloud cover and rainfall as it entered the eastern Caribbean Sea.[image-124]

Since forming on the night (EDT) of July 7, 2013 in the tropical central Atlantic, Tropical Storm Chantal has continued to race westward at up to 29 mph (~46 kph)and entered the eastern Caribbean on July 9 with sustained winds reported at 65 mph (~100 kph) by the National Hurricane Center. 

NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured an image of Chantal on July 9 at 02:37 UTC  (10:37 p.m. EDT, July 8) as Chantal was approaching the Lesser Antilles. The image showed the horizontal distribution of rain intensity within Chantal.

The image was created at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. using data from different TRMM instruments. Rain rates in the center of the swath were from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), and those in the outer swath were from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates were then overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.[image-140]

TRMM revealed that Chantal is a rather small storm with a modest amount of rain located mostly south and east of the center as shown by the blue and green areas indicating light to moderate rain, respectively, below and to the right of the storm symbol.  TRMM, however, does show some evidence of banding (curvature) in the surrounding rain bands, an indicator of the storm's circulation.

On July 10 at 17:40 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured a stunning visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal over the Lesser Antilles that clearly showed most of the clouds and showers were east of the center of circulation.

Chantal is Unusual

Chantal is unusual in two regards. It is the first tropical storm to form this early in the season so far out into the Atlantic since Hurricane Bertha back in 2008, which holds the record for being the eastern-most July storm.  And second, storms that move as fast as Chantal typically have a difficult time intensifying or maintaining their strength, but Chantal has managed so far to intensify into a strong tropical storm.[image-156]

Chantal’s Latest Location

On Wednesday, July 10 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Chantal was just 145 miles (235 km) south of Port Au Prince, Haiti, near latitude 16.5 north and longitude 72.0 west. Chantal is moving toward the west near 29 mph (46 kph). The National Hurricane Center (NHC) expects Chantal will turn west-northwest and then northwest and slow over the next two days. Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph (75 kph) and these strongest winds are north and east of the center. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1011 millibars

Watches and Warnings

The National Hurricane Center issued the following watches and warnings for Chantal as of July 10. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the entire coast of the Dominican Republic, the entire coast of Haiti, Turks and Caicos, and the southeastern Bahamas. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the central Bahamas and Jamaica.  

Over the next several days, Chantal is expected to weaken and continue moving quickly and turn towards the northwest and move between Jamaica and the Dominican Republic, cross over central Cuba and track along Florida’s east coast. Chantal is forecast to weaken to a tropical depression and may even degenerate into a tropical wave during the next 24 hours, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Text credit:  Steve Lang / Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
 


July 09, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Chantal’s Heavy Rainfall and Towering Thunderstorms[image-78]

Two NASA satellites captured a look at Tropical Storm Chantal, from the inside and outside and revealed powerful, high thunderstorms dropping heavy rainfall.

On July 8, NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Chantal’s heaviest rainfall happening at a rate of over 115.5 mm (~4.5 inches) per hour near Chantal's center, where thunderstorms reached heights of over 15 km (~9.3 miles).[image-94]

Later in the day at 1700 UTC (1 p.m. EDT) on July 8, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal. The image showed the Chantal continued to organize as it moves through the Caribbean Sea. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 90 miles (150 km) mainly to the north of the center, but the extent of the cloud cover appears larger in visible imagery.

As of 8 a.m. EDT on July 9, a tropical storm warning was in effect for: Barbados, Dominica, St Lucia, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Puerto Rico and southern coast of the Dominican Republic from Cabo Engano to the border with Haiti. In addition, a tropical storm watch was in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands, Saint Vincent, Vieques and Culebra, Haiti, the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, Turks and Caicos and the southeastern Bahamas.[image-110]

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that a storm surge of 1 to 3 feet above normal tidal levels can be expected in the Windward and Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. Along the southern coast of the Dominican Republic, the surge is expected to be higher, reaching 2 to 4 feet. The heavy rainfall that NASA’s TRMM satellite observed can be expected over the Leeward and Windward Islands, with totals between 2 to 4 inches, and isolated totals to 6 inches.

NHC expects tropical storm conditions are expected to affect portions of Windward Islands today, July 9, and Puerto Rico tonight or early Wednesday.

At 8 a.m. EDT Chantal’s maximum sustained winds were near 50 mph (85 kph). NHC expects some strengthening. Chantal was centered near 13.8 north latitude and 59.7 west longitude, just 45 miles (70 km) north-northwest of Barbados, and 85 miles east of St. Lucia. Chantal was moving to the west-northwest at a speedy 26 mph (43 kph), and is expected to continue in that general direction for the next couple of days. Minimum central pressure is near 1010 millibars. 

Chantal’s center is expected to move into the eastern Caribbean Sea during the afternoon and evening of July 9 and near the Dominican Republic by July 10. Current forecast tracks from the NHC bring Chantal along the eastern coast of Florida by the weekend of July 13 and 14.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro/Hal Pierce
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


July 08, 2013 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Chantal Develop Quickly in Atlantic

The third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean season developed in the Atlantic and not in the Gulf of Mexico as the previous two systems,Tropical Storm Chantal. [image-51]

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal on July 7 at 12:15 p.m. EDT when it was located off the coast of Brazil. The highest and strongest thunderstorms (that cast shadows on the surrounding lower storms) were around the center of circulation. 

On Monday, July 8, Chantal was nearing land areas and warnings and watches were posted.  A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Barbado, Dominica, Saint Lucia, Martinique, and Guadeloupe, and a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Saint Vincent.

In the warning area by early Tuesday, July 9, the National Hurricane Center or NHC expects tropical storm conditions. Those conditions are expected in the watch area later on July 9. Chantal is expected to bring the Leeward and Windward islands rainfall between 2 and 4 inches, with isolated totals to 6 inches.

At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) Chantal’s maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and are expected to increase. The center of Tropical Storm Chantal was located near latitude 10.6 north and longitude 50.6 west. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1007 millibars. The NHC reported that Chantal is moving toward the west near 26 mph (43 kph) and a west-northwestward motion at about the same forward speed is expected over the next couple of days. 

Chantal developed from an unseasonally strong easterly wave that moved off the African coast on July 3, according to Brian McNoldy, Senior Research Associate at University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. 

After affecting the Lesser Antilles Tuesday, Chantal is expected to move into the eastern Caribbean Sea.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

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The MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal on July 7 at 12:15 p.m. EDT when it was located off the coast of Brazil.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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[image-51]
Tropical Storm Chantal
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal on July 8 at 1700 UTC (1 p.m. EDT).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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[image-78]
TRMM image of Chantal
NASA’s TRMM satellite showed that the most intense rain falling in Tropical Storm Chantal on July 8 was falling at a rate of over 115.5 mm/hr. (~4.5 inches) near Chantal's center of circulation.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-94]
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On July 8, NASA’s TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Chantal’s heaviest rainfall happening at a rate of over 115.5 mm/hr. (~4.5 inches) near Chantal's center where thunderstorms reached heights of over 15 km (~9.3 miles).
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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[image-110]
MODIS image of Chantal
On July 10 at 17:40 UTC (1:40 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this stunning visible image of Tropical Storm Chantal over the Lesser Antilles.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
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[image-124]
TRMM image of Chantal
TRMM satellite captured an image of Chantal at 02:37 UTC July 9, 2013 and showed it is a small storm with a modest amount of rain located mostly south and east of the center (blue, green areas) to the right of the storm symbol.
Image Credit: 
NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
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This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation from July 6 to July 10 shows the development of Tropical Storm Chantal in the Atlantic Ocean and movement over Hispaniola by July 10. TRT 0:06
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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Terra image of Chantal
NASA’s Terra satellite captured this visible image of Chantal when it was a tropical storm over Hispaniola on July 10 at 15:20 UTC (11:20 a.m. EDT). Credit:
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
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GOES image of Chantal
NOAA’s GOES-13 captured this image of Chantal’s remnants on July 11 at 10:45 a.m. EDT that showed showers and thunderstorms associated with the low stretched from Hispaniola north into the Bahamas.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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GOES image of Chantal
This visible image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite shows the remnant clouds and showers from Chantal over the Bahamas and the adjacent Atlantic waters at 9:45 a.m. EDT on July 12, 2013.
Image Credit: 
NASA GOES Project
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[image-202]
Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner