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For release: 04-26-04, w/e 04-23-04
Science Ops status report #: 04-121

International Space Station Expedition 8 Science Operations status report for the week ending April 23, 2004

Astronaut Mike Foale, left, Expedition 8 mission commander and NASA science officer, and cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, flight engineer, pose for a snapshot in the Destiny Laboratory.

The Expedition 8 crew continues to serve as test subjects in several experiments onboard the International Space Station. Mike Foale has conducted the Hand Posture Analyzer experiment, which investigates the role of gravity in the planning and executing reaching, grasping, manipulating and transporting objects. Both Foale and Alexander Kaleri are participating in the Renal Stone prevention experiment — a study of how their kidneys function in space.

Photo: Mike Foale and Alexander Kaleri (NASA/JSC)


The Expedition 8 crew continues to serve as test subjects in some of the experiments onboard the International Space Station. NASA ISS Science Officer Mike Foale conducted the Hand Posture Analyzer experiment or HPA, which investigates the role of gravity in the planning and execution hierarchy of reaching, grasping, manipulating and transporting objects. The Italian designed HPA researches the way arm muscles are modified during grasping tasks in weightlessness. Foale donned a sensor-equipped glove called a Posture Acquisition Glove to track his hand and wrists positions. He also measured arm fatigue with gripping and pinching instruments.

Both Foale and Alexander Kaleri are participating in the Renal Stone prevention experiment, looking at how their kidneys function in space. The two have just completed the final collection of urine samples and are still taking the test medication, either potassium citrate or placebo tablets at dinnertime. Since potassium citrate may help prevent kidney stone formation, scientists will be able to see how effective it is at preventing kidney stones in space.

The microgravity environment inside the Space Station changes the way the body metabolizes fluids and the way bone is formed and lost. This may increase the chance of kidney stone formation before and after space flights. To access environmental factors other than microgravity, crew members are recording their food, fluid, and medication intake, as well as their daily exercise in a log.

NASA's payload operations team at the Marshall Center coordinates science activities on Space Station.

For supporting materials for this news release - such as photographs, fact sheets, video and audio files and more - please visit the NASA Marshall Center Newsroom Web site at:

http:// www.msfc.nasa.gov/news/

For more information:
Status report
Photo
Expedition 8 experiment fact sheets
Science Ops News


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