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1999-1997 Chandra X-Ray Observatory Photos
 
Chandra Image of Deep Field in Canes Venatici + Medium (711 x 708, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

This Chandra X-ray Observatory image of a 27.7 hour observation of a region in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici, close to the Big Dipper shows about 3 dozen X-ray sources. Some of the sources were too faint to be seen by optical telescopes such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck 10 meter telescope in Hawaii. This new class of sources may represent some of the most distant objects ever detected. If this sample of the sky is typical, tens of millions of such sources must exist. Image made with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS).

Chandra X-ray image of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia + Large (1024 x 1024, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (640 x 640, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

The red, green, and blue regions in this Chandra X-ray image of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A show where the intensity of low, medium, and high energy X-rays, respectively, is greatest. The red material on the left outer edge is enriched in iron, whereas the bright greenish white region on the lower left is enriched in silicon and sulfur. In the blue region on the right edge, low and medium energy X-rays have been filtered out by a cloud of dust and gas in the remnant. (Image made with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS).

Chandra observation of supernova SN1999em + Large (2250 x 2045, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (540 x 491, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

In late October 1999, a supernova was detected in NGC 1637, a spiral galaxy that is 25 million light years from Earth. Chandra observed the supernova twice soon after the explosion. X-rays, shown by contours overlaid on an optical mage, were detected from 3 million degree gas produced by the supernova. An X-ray source in the center of the galaxy was also detected.

The newest image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a cosmic train wreck of colliding galaxies. + Large (1024 x 1024, 300
+ Medium (512 x 512, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

The newest image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a "cosmic train wreck of colliding galaxies," says Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra's chief project scientist at the Marshall Center. "The result is a beautiful laboratory where we can study the details of what happens in these collisions."

Chandra X-ray Observatory image of the distant galaxy 3C295 + Large (2500 x 2500, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (600 x 600, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory image of the distant galaxy 3C295 shows it as an explosive galaxy — possibly the result of being enveloped by a vast gas cloud containing more than 100 galaxies. Astronomers believe an excess of matter falling into a massive black hole triggered the explosion — hurling an enormous release of energy back into the gas cloud. This energy, or X-radiation, is highlighted in this colorized image.

Centaurus A + Large (3000 x 2960, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (512 x 505, 150)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

Centaurus A At a distance of 11 million light years, Centaurus A or NGC 5128, is the nearest example of a type of galaxy called an active galaxy. It is a large elliptically shaped galaxy that shows evidence of repeated explosions, probably from a supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy. Radio and Chandra X-ray images of the galaxy show a jet of high energy particles blasting out from the center. Because of its unusual nature and proximity, it is one of the most extensively studied galaxies in the southern hemisphere.

Eta Carinae + Large (2100 x 2100, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (504 x 504, 72 ppi)
+ Small (200 x 160, 72 ppi)

The Chandra X-ray Observatory image shows the complex nature of the region around Eta Carinae, a massive supergiant star that is 7,500 light years from Earth. The outer horseshoe shaped ring has a temperature of about 3 million degrees Kelvin. It is about two light years in diameter and was probably caused by an outburst that occurred more than a thousand years ago. The blue cloud in the inner core is three light months in diameter and is much hotter. The white area, less than a light month in diameter, is the hottest and may contain the superstar.

Comparison of Eta Carinae Images + Large (1024 x 1024, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (512 x 512, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

Chandra X-ray image of Eta Carinae, the most luminous star known in our galaxy, as compared to an optical image by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Crab Nebula + Large (1024 x 1019, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (512 x 510, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

The Chandra X-ray image of the Crab Nebula shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar.

Supernova Remnant E0102-72 + Large (436 x 438, 72 ppi)
+ Medium (218 x 219, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x100, 72 ppi)

Object Description: E0102-72 is a supernova remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This galaxy is 190,000 light years from Earth. E0102 -72, which is approximately a thousand years old, is believed to have resulted from the explosion of a massive star. Stretching across forty light years of space, the multi-million degree source resembles a flaming cosmic wheel.

Supernova remnant Coordinates G21.5-0.9 + Large (482 x 400, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (241 x 200, 150 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

The identification of G21.5-0.9 as the remnant of a supernova explosion is based on indirect evidence from radio and x-ray observations. At both radio and x-ray wavelengths, it appears as round patch in the sky. Detailed observations with radio telescopes confirm that the radio waves are produced by high energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines (synchrotron radiation). The x-rays are probably produced by the same process, but the electrons involved have energies many thousands times higher than those that produce the radio waves. The favored theory is that the high energy electrons responsible for both the radio and x-ray emission are produced by a rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron star left behind when a massive star exploded some 40,000 years ago.

Neutron star/Supernova Remnant PSR 0540-69 + Medium (465 x 384, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi) + Large (929 x 768, 300 ppi

PSR 0540-69 is a neutron star, or pulsar, that is rotating very rapidly, making a complete rotation every one-twentieth of a second. It is similar in many ways to the famous Crab Nebula pulsar. Both objects are spinning rapidly, are about 1,000 years old and are surrounded by a large cloud of gas and high energy particles. The surrounding cloud in both cases is powered by the conversion of rotational energy of the neutron star into high energy particles through the combined action of rapid rotation and a strong magnetic field. PSR 0540-69 is 180,000 light years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of the Milky Way's small satellite galaxies.

Cassiopeia A, Chandra X-ray Image + Large (2133 x 2133, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (1067 x 1067, 150 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

Cassiopeia A, Chandra X-ray Image

Cassiopeia A, Rosat X-ray + Large (1480 x 1262, 200 ppi)
+ Medium (640 x 546, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

Cassiopeia A, Rosat X-ray

Cassiopeia A, optical telescope + Large (2100 x 2112, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (636 x 640, 150 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

Cassiopeia A, optical telescope

PKS 0637-752 Quasar, Chandra X-ray Image + Large (2100 x 2104, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (1050 x 1052, 150 ppi
+ Small (100 x 100, 72 ppi)

PKS 0637-752 Quasar, Chandra X-ray Image