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Coalition of NASA, Army, Academic Researchers Wins Contract to Develop Innovative Flight Navigation Technology
10.31.12
 
Shannon Ridinger
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
shannon.j.ridinger@nasa.gov

Mervin Brokke
AMRDEC, Huntsville, Ala.
256-990-7201
mervin.brokke@us.army.mil

Chris Rink
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.
757-864-6786
chris.rink@nasa.gov

Image release: 12-111


Marshall physicist Dr. David Smith, co-principal investigator for NASA's new 'Fast Light Optical Gyroscope' technology development effort. › Large (3672 x 2832, 240 ppi)
› Medium (516 x 775, 72 ppi)
› Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Dr. David Smith, an optical physicist at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., studies a container of the atomic gas Rubidium87, which he and a team of researchers will use in their development of advanced optical gyroscopes to drive a new generation of navigation systems for spacecraft and military and commercial vehicles. The three-year project includes researchers at the Marshall Center; the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville; and Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. (MSFC/Emmett Given)


Tackling an innovative new technology development effort for NASA are, from right, Dr. David Smith, Krishna Myneni and Hongrok Chang. › Large (4256 x 2832, 240 ppi)
› Medium (516 x 343, 72 ppi)
› Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Tackling an innovative new technology development effort for NASA are, from right, Dr. David Smith, an optical physicist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.; U.S. Army researcher Krishna Myneni of the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville; and Army contractor Hongrok Chang. They're part of a team undertaking a three-year project to develop innovative new gyroscopes that could dramatically improve in-flight navigation capabilities for space vehicles, military air and sea assets and commercial vehicles. Smith, the co-principal investigator for the project, says his team seeks to deliver gyroscopes at least 1,000 times more sensitive than those used in today's vehicles. The project includes researchers at the Marshall Center, AMRDEC and Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. (MSFC/Emmett Given)


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