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NASA Research Team Reveals Moon Has Earth-like Core
01.06.11
 
Dwayne Brown
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1726
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

Janet Anderson
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
janet.l.anderson@nasa.gov

Image release: H-11-004


An artist's rendering of the lunar core as identified in new findings by a NASA-led research team. › Large (868 x 866, 300 ppi)
› Medium (516 x 515, 72 ppi)
› Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

An artist's rendering of the lunar core as identified in new findings by a NASA-led research team. According to their paper, published Jan. 6 in the journal "Science," the moon possesses a solid, iron-rich inner core with a radius of nearly 150 miles and a fluid outer core with a radius of roughly 205 miles. It also has a partially molten boundary layer around the core, estimated to have a radius of nearly 300 miles. The team includes scientists from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.; Arizona State University in Tempe; the University of California at Santa Cruz; and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris in France. (MSFC/Renee Weber)

Dr. Renee Weber › Large (1285 x 2100, 300 ppi)
› Medium (516 x 843, 72 ppi)
› Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Dr. Renee Weber, a space scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., led an international team of researchers that applied state-of-the-art seismological techniques to Apollo-era data to credibly detect what scientists have surmised for years: Our moon has a core. Their findings were published Jan. 6 in "Science," the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (MSFC/Emmett Given)

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