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Students Send 39 Rockets Into Sunny Alabama Skies During Tenth Annual NASA Student Rocketry Challenge
04.21.11
 
Angela Storey
256-544-0034
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
Angela.storey@nasa.gov

Image release: 11-053


From left, siblings Janet Nieto, Ana Karen Nieto and Hilario Nieto discuss their flight vehicle with Steve Cash, manager of the Shuttle Propulsion Office at the Marshall Center. › Large (2100 x 1397, 300 ppi)
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From left, siblings Janet Nieto, Ana Karen Nieto and Hilario Nieto -- comprising one of two NASA Student Launch Projects rocketry teams from Presidio High School in Presidio, Texas -- discuss their flight vehicle with Steve Cash, manager of the Shuttle Propulsion Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The students visited the Marshall April 15 to show off their work to Marshall team members and finalize their launch plans. The annual NASA education event, which concluded with 39 rocket launches on April 17, drew more than 500 students from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 23 states -- all vying to see whose rocket could come closest to the 1-mile altitude goal and safely return its onboard science payload to Earth. The event is organized for NASA by the Marshall Center and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems in Salt Lake City, Utah. (NASA/MSFC/Doug Stoffer)



Lucas Kalathas, second from right; Steve Cash, left; Digna Carballosa, second from left; and Jim Halsell › Large (2100 x 1397, 300 ppi)
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Lucas Kalathas, second from right, a student at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania, receives his 2010-11 NASA Student Launch Projects participation award from Steve Cash, left, manager of the Shuttle Propulsion Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.; Digna Carballosa, second from left, deputy director of the Marshall Center's Office of Human Capital; and Jim Halsell, vice president of Space Exploration Systems for ATK Aerospace Systems of Salt Lake City, Utah. Forty-four teams of students from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 23 states took part in the rocketry challenge April 17. The annual NASA education event tasks students to build and fly a rocket 1 mile high and safely return its onboard science payload to Earth. The event, which marked its 10 anniversary this year, is organized for NASA by the Marshall Center and sponsored by ATK. (NASA/MSFC/Doug Stoffer)



Team members from Fisk University in Nashville › Large (2100 x 1397, 300 ppi)
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Team members from Fisk University in Nashville wait their turn to head out to the launch pad during the 2010-11 NASA Student Launch Projects rocketry challenge, held April 17 at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala. The annual NASA education event drew more than 500 students from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 23 states, all vying to see whose rocket could come closest to the 1-mile altitude goal and safely return its onboard science payload to Earth. The event is organized by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems in Salt Lake City, Utah. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)



Painted with a striking DNA helix pattern, a rocket built by students at Presidio High School in Presidio, Texas, takes flight. › Large (4100 x 2100, 300 ppi)
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Painted with a striking DNA helix pattern, a rocket built by students at Presidio High School in Presidio, Texas, takes flight. Its working science payload -- a requirement of every student team participating in NASA's Student Launch Projects rocketry challenge -- analyzed the DNA of the desert shrub ocotillo, studying the effects of pressure, temperature and acceleration on their samples during flight. This year's "launchfest" saw 39 student rockets fly over Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala., marking the 10th anniversary of the annual NASA education event. More than 500 students took part, representing middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 23 states. All vied to see whose rocket could come closest to the 1-mile altitude goal and safely return its onboard science payload to Earth. The event is organized by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems in Salt Lake City, Utah. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)



Representing the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, the 16-member 'Rocket Girls' team watches excitedly as their flight vehicle soars skyward. › Large (2100 x 1400, 300 ppi)
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Representing the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, the 16-member "Rocket Girls" team -- all young women -- watches excitedly as their flight vehicle soars skyward during the 2010-11 NASA Student Launch Projects rocketry challenge, held April 17 at Bragg Farms in Toney, Ala. The annual NASA education event drew more than 500 students from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 23 states, all vying to see whose rocket could come closest to the 1-mile altitude goal and safely return its onboard science payload to Earth. The event is organized by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and sponsored by ATK Aerospace Systems in Salt Lake City, Utah. (NASA/MSFC/David Higginbotham)


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