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Orion's New Launch Abort Motor Test Stand Ready for Action
06.09.08
 
Grey Hautaluoma/Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0668/4997
grey.hautaluoma-1@nasa.gov, stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov

Jennifer Morcone
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
jennifer.j.morcone@nasa.gov

George Torres
Alliant Techsystems, Brigham City, Utah
801-699-2637
george.torres@atk.com

Photo release: H-08-137


Technicians inspect the full-scale inert abort motor and test stand at ATK's facility in Promontory, Utah. > Large (703 x 1050, 150 ppi)
> Medium (516 x 771, 72 ppi)
> Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Technicians at Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, in Promontory, Utah, inspect the facility's new test stand, which contains the inverted, full-scale inert abort motor for the Orion crew capsule's launch abort system. The abort motor, which anchors atop the capsule, is designed to pull Orion and its the crew safely away from the Ares I rocket in the event of a mishap on the launch pad or during the first 300,000 feet of the launch. The launch abort system is a key element in NASA's continuing efforts to improve safety as the agency develops the next generation of spacecraft to return humans to the moon. (ATK)


The vertical test platform for the full-scale abort motor allows the motor to be tested top side down with the nozzles pointing skyward. The platform is housed in a movable building to keep the motor out of the elements until it is tested. > Large (703 x 1050, 150 ppi)
> Medium (516 x 771, 72 ppi)
> Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Alliant Techsystems' new vertical test platform -- built at the company's facility in Promontory, Utah, to test the full-scale abort motor for the Orion crew capsule's launch abort system -- allows the motor to be tested top-side-down with its nozzles pointing skyward. The platform is housed in a movable building to keep the motor out of the elements until it is tested. The launch abort system is a key element in NASA's continuing efforts to improve safety as the agency develops the next generation of spacecraft to return humans to the moon. (ATK)

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