Photo Gallery

NASA Imaging Team Develops 'Eye in Sky' for Shuttle Chase Planes
04.14.05
 
 
Melissa Mathews
NASA Headquarters, Washington
(Phone: 202.358.1272)

Steve Roy
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
(Phone: 256.544.0034)
News release: H-05-097


WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, a swiveling, nose-mounted video recording system designed to capture visible-light and infrared imagery of the Shuttle as it lifts off on its journey to orbit. + Large (2272 x 1704, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (722 x 540, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Two WB-57 jet planes, normally used by NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for high-altitude weather research, will help track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. An engineering team lead by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., designed and built the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, a swiveling, nose-mounted video recording system designed to capture visible-light and infrared imagery of the Shuttle as it lifts off on its journey to orbit. The primary optic lens, a 4,150-millimeter reflector telescope, can be seen on the right of the WAVE turret. Discovery is expected to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., between May 15 and June 3. Image credit: NASA/MSFC/JSC

One of two WB-57 jet planes, normally used by NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston for high-altitude weather research, prepares for takeoff, carrying a special nose-mounted imaging system,  the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, that will help NASA track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. + Large (1280x 720, 72 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 405, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

One of two WB-57 jet planes, normally used by NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for high-altitude weather research, prepares for takeoff, carrying a special nose-mounted imaging system that will help NASA track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. An engineering team lead by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., designed and built the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, a video recording system designed to capture visible-light and infrared imagery of the Shuttle as it lifts off on its journey to orbit. Discovery is expected to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., between May 15 and June 3. Image credit: NASA/MSFC/JSC

One of NASA’s WB-57 jet planes takes to the skies, carrying a special nose-mounted imaging system that will help NASA track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. + Large (1280 x 720, 72 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 405, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

One of NASA’s WB-57 jet planes takes to the skies, carrying a special nose-mounted imaging system that will help NASA track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. The WB-57s are normally used by NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston for high-altitude weather research. An engineering team lead by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., designed and built the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, a video recording system designed to capture visible-light and infrared imagery of the Shuttle as it lifts off on its journey to orbit. Discovery is expected to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., between May 15 and June 3. Image credit: NASA/MSFC/JSC



The heart of the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, is the 'optical bench,' the gimbal-mounted structure that contains the telescopic lens and cameras. + Large (2048 x 1536, 72 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 540, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

The heart of the WB-57 Ascent Video Experiment, or WAVE project, is the “optical bench,” the gimbal-mounted structure that contains the telescopic lens and cameras. Mounted on the nose of NASA’s WB-57 jet, a high-altitude plane used by NASA’s Johnson Space Center for weather research, the video imaging system will help NASA track and safeguard Shuttle Discovery during STS-114: Space Shuttle Return to Flight. An engineering team lead by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., designed and built the WAVE system to capture visible-light and infrared imagery of the Shuttle during liftoff. Discovery is expected to launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., between May 15 and June 3. Image credit: NASA/MSFC/JSC

+ News Release
 
 
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http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/multimedia/photos/2005/photosH-05-097.html