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International Space Station
 

Additional photo releases about the International Space Station:
http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/2000/photos00-268.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/1999/photos99-108.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/1998/photos98-236.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/1998/photos98-239.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/2000/photos00-333.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/2000/photos00-221.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/photos/2000/photos00-255.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/microgravityscienceglovebox.htm http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/photos/photogallery/iss/iss.htm


Photo description: The International Space Station, shortly after undocking from Space Shuttle Endeavour on June 15, 2002

The International Space Station, shortly after undocking from the Space Shuttle Endeavour on June 15, 2002.

Photo Credit: NASA/JSC

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Photo description: International Space Station, August 20, 2001

Backdropped by Earth dotted with clouds, this close up view of the International Space Station (ISS) was taken by one of the crew members on the Space Shuttle Discovery after undocking on August 20, 2001 after more than a week of joint operations.

Photo Credit: NASA/JSC

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Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, the International Space Station was photographed by a crew member aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour when it visited the Space Station on the STS-108 mission in December 2001.

Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, the International Space Station was photographed by a crew member aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour when it visited the Space Station on the STS-108 mission in December 2001.

Photo Credit: NASA

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Artist's concept of the International Space Station

Artist's concept of the International Space Station

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The Human Research Facility -- a standardized rack that will house human life science experiments aboard the International Space Station -- is inspected by members of the International Space Station manufacturing team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The facility was recently shipped from the Marshall Center to Johnson Space Center in Houston. The Human Research Facility is one of two life sciences facilities being built at Marshall. It is to be installed aboard the space station in 2000 and will be the first experiment rack aboard the Station. The Human Research Facility was built by The Boeing Co. at the Marshall Center.
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U.S. Laboratory Module Marshall Space Flight Center and Boeing engineers, having put their stamp of approval on the International Space Station's U.S. Laboratory Module, prepare to ship the lab from the Marshall Center in Huntsville, Ala., to Kennedy Space Center, Fla. The lab module is scheduled to be launched into space in early 2000.
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Unity Node

The Unity node is readied for transport from NASA's Marshall Center in Huntsville, Ala., to Kennedy Space Center, Fla., in June 1997. The node, launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour Friday, Dec. 4, is a six-sided connector to which all future U.S. Station modules will attach. Once the Space Station is fully constructed, Unity will serve as a habitable passageway to Space Station modules. Unity was manufactured by The Boeing Co. at Marshall from 1994 to 1997.

Photo Credit: Boeing Co.

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