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Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812

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The Marshall Star is published online every Wednesday by the Public and Employee Communications Office at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Submissions should be written legibly and include the originator's name.

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Marshall Star, September 26, 2012 Edition
 
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In This Week's Star (Click to Expand)


NASA's Patrick Scheuermann Named Marshall Center Director

The Marshall Center's new director, Patrick Scheuermann, addresses the workforce Sept. 26 in Morris Auditorium. On Sept. 25, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden announced three changes to his senior leadership team.

Image right: The Marshall Center's new director, Patrick Scheuermann, addresses the workforce Sept. 26 in Morris Auditorium. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)


Robert Lightfoot, acting associate administrator at NASA Headquarters, has assumed that role on a permanent basis. Patrick Scheuermann, director of the Stennis Space Center, has become director of the Marshall Space Flight Center. Scheuermann replaces Robin Henderson, who filled the position on a temporary basis following former director Gene Goldman's retirement Aug. 3. Lightfoot began his assignment as acting associate administrator March 5.

Scheuermann's successor as Stennis director is Dr. Richard J. Gilbrech, who previously had served as that center's deputy director.

All three management changes are effective immediately.

"Robert, Patrick and Rick are three of NASA's finest public servants who will continue to play key roles in our agency's future," said Bolden. "America is fortunate to have three such talented leaders assuming these important jobs at a pivotal time for NASA and space exploration."

As associate administrator, Lightfoot is the agency's highest-ranking civil servant, responsible for oversight and integration of NASA's broad efforts in human spaceflight, science and aeronautics. Lightfoot began his NASA career as a test engineer and manager for the space shuttle main engine technology test bed program. He then served in leadership positions at Marshall, Stennis and Headquarters. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant associate administrator for the Space Shuttle Program, Office of Space Flight, at Headquarters.

Scheuermann has provided executive leadership, overall direction and management of Stennis since being named that center's director in 2010. He is responsible for implementing NASA's mission in the area of rocket propulsion testing, and developing and maintaining NASA's world-class rocket propulsion test facilities.

Scheuermann previously served as Stennis' deputy director and associate director, in addition to working as chief operating officer of the Michoud Assembly Facility. Since joining NASA in 1988 as a propulsion test engineer, he worked on numerous major test projects at Stennis, including serving as project manager for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle program, a NASA-industry effort to develop a new generation of safe and cost-effective rockets to send payloads to space.

Gilbrech has served as Stennis' deputy director since 2010. He began his NASA career in 1991 at Stennis in the area of propulsion test technology. From 1998 to 2000, he served as chief of the Propulsion Test Engineering Division at Stennis, and in 2003, he was named manager of the Propulsion Integration Office, responsible for managing NASA's rocket propulsion test facilities.

Later in 2003, Gilbrech relocated to Langley Research Center to become a principal engineer in the NASA Engineering and Safety Center. He later served as deputy of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center and as deputy director of Langley. In 2006, Gilbrech was named director of Stennis, serving in that role until assuming leadership of NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at Headquarters in Washington.

All three men are highly honored NASA leaders, earning the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and agency medals for outstanding leadership.

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CFC 2012 Kicks Off with Rally Oct. 10; Sign up for Community Service Days, Bus Tours
By Megan Davidson

Miss Alabama, Anna Laura Bryan It's time again for the season of giving -- get ready for the 2012 Combined Federal Campaign!

Image left: Miss Alabama, Anna Laura Bryan (Special to the Star)


The Marshall Space Flight Center's annual goodwill drive will officially begin Oct. 1 and run through Dec. 15. The theme for this year's campaign is "Find Your Passion." The Marshall Center's fundraising goal is set at $700,000.

"When I was working the early stages of this year's campaign, I was struck by the sheer volume and incredible diversity of charitable organizations represented by the CFC," said Patrick Rasco, chairman of Marshall's CFC campaign. "That's how we came up with the slogan 'Find Your Passion.' With more than 2,600 charities participating in CFC, I think people will easily find an organization that they are passionate about supporting -- whether it is one that funds medical research, veterans, the arts, children's relief, local universities, the environment or the homeless."

A CFC kickoff rally will be held at 10 a.m. Oct. 10 at Activities Building 4316. The "crowning" highlight of the event will be a presentation by the reigning Miss Alabama, Anna Laura Bryan. Her platform is autism awareness. Bryan works with Paws 4 Autism, an organization whose mission is to help the families of children with autism connect to the world through the use of service dogs. Bryan will be available after the rally for autographs and pictures.

Also speaking at the event will be a local hero from the Wounded Warrior Project, which raises awareness and provides services to injured military service members. More information about the speaker is forthcoming and will be available to Marshall team members on ExplorNet.

Combined Federal Campaign logo Representatives from numerous charitable organizations will participate in a CFC expo during the rally, talking with team members about their services. Light refreshments will be served, and door prizes will be given away at the end of the event.

Community Service Days -- in which volunteers lend their time to support charities and special events -- are already in full swing. A host of Marshall team members recently helped with applicant registration for the Salvation Army's annual Angel Tree, which provides Christmas assistance to qualifying children and seniors. Other local nonprofit organizations and events -- including the Downtown Rescue Mission, Special Olympics and the Burritt Museum Association -- have volunteer opportunities available for sign-up here.

The wheels also will be turning soon for bus tours, in which team members can visit and get a first-hand look at how CFC dollars help charitable organizations in the community. Tours will begin Oct. 18 to the Ability Plus Day Habilitation Center in Huntsville, which specializes in vocational preparation and independent living skills for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Other stops include the National Children's Advocacy Center; the Land Trust of North Alabama; and the Huntsville Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. To see a full listing of bus tours, and to sign up, go here.

The Marshall Center's CFC effort is part of the Tennessee Valley Combined Federal Campaign -- a joint effort that also includes the Army's Aviation and Missile Command and other federal agencies at Redstone Arsenal and in surrounding Alabama and Tennessee counties.

Davidson, an AI Signal Research Inc. employee, supports the Office of Strategic Analysis & Communications.

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2012 Industry & Advocates Awards Honor Top Marshall Contractors, Support Teams
By Rick Smith

NASA logo Numerous large and small business prime contractors, subcontractors and civil-service teams were honored Sept. 20 during the 2012 Industry & Advocates Awards ceremony hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

The awards reflect recipients' leadership in the aerospace business community and their sustained support for the work of the Marshall Center and NASA. They were presented during the semi-annual meeting of Marshall's Small Business Alliance at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center's Davidson Center for Space Exploration in Huntsville. Established in 2007, the alliance helps small businesses pursue NASA procurement and subcontracting opportunities.

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Inc. of Canoga Park, Calif., was named Marshall's Large Business Prime Contractor of the Year. The company is developing the J-2X engine for the Marshall Center. The J-2X is designed to power the upper stage of NASA's evolved Space Launch System, the advanced heavy-lift rocket set to enable a new era of robust, versatile exploration missions beyond Earth orbit.

Bastion Technologies of Houston was named Marshall's Small Business Prime Contractor of the Year. The engineering and scientific services company provides industrial safety services, equipment and supplies to Marshall in support of the Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate and associated engineering and hardware design and development activities across the center.

Bangham Engineering Inc. of Huntsville was named Marshall's Small Business Subcontractor of the Year. The company, which supports the Jacobs Engineering, Sciences & Technical Services, or ESTS, contract at Marshall, specializes in flight test integration, flight vehicle development, and advanced civil space and defense development programs.

The Marshall Center presented Small Business Subcontractor Excellence Awards to:
  • Avans Machine & Tool Inc. of Scottsboro, Ala., which provides precision machining and fabrication support at Marshall as a subcontractor for Jacobs Engineering of Huntsville
  • Barrios Technology of Houston which provides systems development and operations support at Marshall as a subcontractor for Teledyne Brown Engineering of Huntsville
  • Comprehensive Occupational Resources of Baton Rouge, La., a Jacobs Engineering subcontractor providing manufacturing and facility operations support at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility
  • Force Measurement Systems Inc. of Fullerton, Calif., a subcontractor for ATK Aerospace Systems of Salt Lake City, which provides component analysis and testing for Space Launch System booster stage work at Marshall
  • KORD Technologies Inc. of Huntsville, a subcontractor for the Boeing Company of Huntsville, which provides mechanical structural design services for Space Launch System core stage element work at Marshall
Small Business Program Leadership Awards were presented to Debbie Batson, manager of business development at Teledyne Brown Engineering, and Donna Coleman, founder and president of Aetos Systems in Huntsville. Batson and Coleman were honored for their service as chairs and longtime participants on the Prime Contractor Supplier Council and the Small Business Executive Leadership Team, respectively -- key organizations supporting the small-business goals of Marshall, NASA and the aerospace industry.

Kathy Wooten-Hale, an employee of InfoPro Corp. in Huntsville, received a Small Business Advocate Award for her leadership in planning and conducting outreach in support of Marshall's Small Business Program.

Marshall engineer Lynn Garrison of the Engineering Directorate's Technical Management Office was honored as Technical Support Person of the Year -- her second such honor in three years. Garrison, Marshall's small business technical advisor, was recognized for her continuing dedication to and support of NASA and Marshall small business programs.

The Marshall Center's Integrated Program Support Team was recognized as the Procurement Support Team of the Year. Team members, including Tammy Bissell, Keith Burleson, Maureen LaComb, Roxanne Melton and Stephen Newton, were recognized for exemplary support of small business programs and goals across Marshall and NASA.

Marshall's Protective Services Team was honored as Program Support Team of the Year. Team members, including Walter Melton, Jeffrey Branting, Sherry Fenn, William "Rip" Nabors and Jane Thomas, were recognized for support provided during acquisition planning on the Marshall Integrated Program Support Services requirement, which provides a variety of program support services across the center.

NASA civil-service employees nominate eligible individuals and organizations for awards. A panel of NASA business procurement officials evaluates each nominee's cost-conscious business practices, innovative processes and adoption of new technologies, as well as their overall contributions to NASA's Office of Small Business Programs and the agency in general.

Center-level award recipients in several categories will be candidates for the agency-level Small Business Industry Awards. Those awards will be presented in April 2013 at NASA's fifth annual Small Business Symposium & Awards Ceremony in Washington.

Smith, an AI Signal Research Inc. employee, supports the Office of Strategic Analysis & Communications.

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NASA Selects Space Launch System Advanced Development Proposals
NASA news release

An artist rendering of the various configurations of NASA's Space Launch System managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. NASA has selected 26 proposals from academia and industry for advanced development activities for the nation's next heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System, also known as SLS. Proposals selected under this NASA Research Announcement, or NRA, seek innovative and affordable solutions to evolve the launch vehicle from its initial configuration to its full lift capacity capable of sending humans farther into deep space than ever before.

Image right: An artist rendering of the various configurations of NASA's Space Launch System, managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The flexible configuration, sharing the same basic core-stage, allows for different crew and cargo flights as needed, promoting efficiency, time and cost savings. The SLS enables exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit and support travel to asteroids, Mars and other destinations within our solar system. (NASA)


NASA sought proposals in a variety of areas, including concept development, trades and analyses, propulsion, structures, materials, manufacturing, avionics and software.

"Engaging with academia and industry gives us the opportunity to take advantage of the ingenuity and expertise beyond NASA," said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. "It will help us optimize affordability while integrating mature technical upgrades into future vehicles."

NASA is partnering with the U.S. Air Force on this research announcement in support of common national rocket propulsion goals.

Individual awards will vary with a total government investment of as much as $48 million. Initial fiscal year 2012 awards are worth as much as $8 million for industry and $2.5 million for academia. The selections will be made in advance of negotiations for potential awards. Awards depend on successful negotiation and stability of appropriated funds.

The proposals from academia selected for contract and grant negotiations are:
-- "High Electric Density Device for Aerospace Applications," Auburn University, Ala.
-- "Challenges Towards Improved Friction Stir Welds Using On-line Sensing of Weld Quality," Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
-- "A New Modeling Approach for Rotating Cavitation Instabilities in Rocket Engine Turbopumps," Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge
-- "Algorithmic Enhancements for High-Resolution Hybrid RANS-LES Using Loci-CHEM," Mississippi State University
-- "Next Generation Simulation Infrastructure on Large Scale Multicore Architecture," Mississippi State University
-- "Characterization of Aluminum/Alumina/Carbon Interactions under Simulated Rocket Motor Conditions," Pennsylvania State University, University Park
-- "Development of Subcritical Atomization Models in the Loci Framework for Liquid Rocket Injectors," University of Florida, Gainesville
-- "Determination of Heat Transfer Coefficients for Two-Phase Flows of Cryogenic Propellants During Line Chilldown and Fluid Transport," University of Florida, Gainesville
-- "Validation of Subsonic Film Cooling Numerical Simulations Using Detailed Measurements and Novel Diagnostics," University of Maryland, College Park
-- "Validation of Supersonic Film Cooling Numerical Simulations Using Detailed Measurements and Novel Diagnostics," University of Maryland, College Park
-- "Advanced LES and Laser Diagnostics to Model Transient Combustion-Dynamical Processes in Rocket Engines: Prediction of Flame Stabilization and Combustion-Instabilities," University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
-- "Acoustic Emission-Based Health Monitoring of Space Launch System Structures," University of Utah, Salt Lake City

Industry proposals selected for contract negotiations are:
-- "Development of a Fluid-Structure Interaction Methodology for Predicting Engine Loads," ATA Engineering Inc., San Diego
-- "Space Launch System Advanced Development Affordable Composite Structures," ATK Space Systems Inc., Clearfield, Utah
-- "Ball Reliable Advanced Integrated Network," Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Huntsville.
-- "Affordable Structural Weight Reduction for SLS Block 1A," Collier Research and Development Corp., Newport News, Va.
-- "DESLA Systems Engineering and Risk Reduction for AUSEP," Exquadrum Inc., Adelanto, Calif.
-- "Space Launch System Program AUSEP LOX Flow Control Valve," MOOG Inc. Space and Defense Group, Aurora, N.Y.
-- "Affordable Upper Stage Engine Advanced Development," Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Redondo Beach, Calif.
-- "Hybrid Precision Casting for Regeneratively-Cooled Thrust Chamber Components," Orbital Technologies Corp., Madison, Wis.
-- "NASA Space Launch System Advanced Development, Affordable Upper Stage Engine Program, or AUSE, Study," Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Inc., Jupiter, Fla.
-- "Advanced Ordnance Systems Demonstration," Reynolds Systems Inc., Middletown, Calif.
-- "Cryo-Tracker Mass Gauging System," Sierra Lobo Inc., Freemont, Ohio
-- "Efficient High-Fidelity Design and Analysis Tool for Unsteady Flow Physics in Space Propulsion Geometries," Streamline Numerics Inc., Gainesville, Fla.
-- "Robust Distributed Sensor Interface Modules, or DSIM, for SLS," The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif.
-- "Integrated Vehicle Fluids, or IVF," United Launch Alliance, Centennial, Colo.

Designed to be flexible for launching payloads and spacecraft, including NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle that will take humans beyond low-Earth orbit, SLS will enable the agency to achieve its deep space exploration goals.

"While we are moving out on the initial 70-metric-ton configuration of the vehicle, we will continue to examine concepts, designs and options that will advance the rocket to a 130-metric-ton vehicle, which is essential for deep space exploration," said Todd May, SLS program manager at the Marshall Space Flight Center. "Competitive opportunities like this research announcement ensure we deliver a safe, affordable, sustainable launch system."

The proposal selections are the first step in the NRA procurement process. The period of performance for these awards will be one year with as many as two one-year options. The second step, formal contract awards, will follow further negotiations between NASA and selected organizations.

All proposals will be valid for 12 months to allow for a later award if the opportunity becomes available, unless the offeror withdraws the proposal prior to award. Successful offerors to this NRA will not be guaranteed an award for any future advanced development acquisition.

The first flight test of NASA's SLS, which will feature a configuration for a 77-ton (70-metric-ton) lift capacity, is scheduled for 2017 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

For information about NASA's Space Launch System, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sls.

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Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion Tours Marshall, Learns About Center Capabilities

The U.S. Army Materiel Command's new deputy commanding general, Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion, right, tours the Marshall Space Flight Center with her husband retired Army Col. Leif Johnson, center, on Sept. 18. The U.S. Army Materiel Command's new deputy commanding general, Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion, right, tours the Marshall Space Flight Center with her husband retired Army Col. Leif Johnson, center, on Sept. 18. Paul McConnaughey, left, associate director for technical management in the Engineering Directorate, shares how the 7-Axis Milling Machine in Building 4705 will be used for advanced manufacturing of space hardware. For more information about the machine, visit here. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)





Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion, left, visiting the South High Bay of Building 4755, listens to Tim Vaughn, a metallic materials aerospace engineer in the Engineering Directorate, as he explains the Marshall Center's friction stir welding capabilities. Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion, left, visiting the South High Bay of Building 4755, listens to Tim Vaughn, a metallic materials aerospace engineer in the Engineering Directorate, as he explains the Marshall Center's friction stir welding capabilities. Friction stir welding uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high-strength bonds virtually free of defects. The welding process transforms metals from a solid state into a "plastic-like" state, and uses a rotating pin tool to soften, stir and forge a bond between two metal plates to form a uniform welded joint -- a vital requirement of next-generation space hardware. To learn more, visit here. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)

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Celebrating Diversity: Hispanic Heritage Month at Marshall

Members of the AMC Jazz Ensemble try some authentic Hispanic cuisine Sept. 11 during a food-tasting event in Building 4203. The culinary fiesta kicked off the Marshall Space Flight Center's commemoration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated each year from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Members of the AMC Jazz Ensemble try some authentic Hispanic cuisine Sept. 11 during a food-tasting event in Building 4203. The culinary fiesta kicked off the Marshall Space Flight Center's commemoration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated each year from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. (MSFC/Emmett Given)









David McBride, director of NASA's Dryden Research Center, addresses a Marshall Center audience Sept. 11. He spoke about NASA's strong diversity ethos and his own Hispanic heritage. David McBride, director of NASA's Dryden Research Center, addresses a Marshall Center audience Sept. 11. He spoke about NASA's strong diversity ethos and his own Hispanic heritage. (MSFC/Emmett Given)











Marshall space systems engineer and U.S. Navy Ensign Hernando Gauto, center, receives a kiss from his wife Alisa during his Navy commissioning ceremony, held Sept. 18 in Building 4200, Morris Auditorium. Gauto's father, Eleuterio Gauto, left, looks on. Marshall space systems engineer and U.S. Navy Ensign Hernando Gauto, center, receives a kiss from his wife Alisa during his Navy commissioning ceremony, held Sept. 18 in Building 4200, Morris Auditorium. Gauto's father, Eleuterio Gauto, left, looks on. (MSFC/Emmett Given)









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Office of Center Operations Honors Hard-Working Team Members at Annual Awards Ceremony

: The Office of Center Operations at the Marshall Space Flight Center honored dedicated employees during its annual awards ceremony last month. At right, Steve Doering, director of the office, addresses the organization's team during the awards presentation at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. The Office of Center Operations at the Marshall Space Flight Center honored dedicated employees during its annual awards ceremony last month. At right, Steve Doering, director of the office, addresses the organization's team during the awards presentation at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. Doering leads approximately 700 civil service employees and contractors who provide essential services to Marshall's programs and projects, such as security, facilities, logistics, and environmental and labor relations. Many employees were honored with group achievement awards including the Alternative Fuel Green Initiative Team, MAF Construction of Facility SLS Team, COF Prioritization and Recapitalization Team, Building 4487 Roof Repair and Replacement Team, and Program Critical Hardware Move Team. Civil service employees receiving peer awards were Mike Bradford, Customer Service Award; Eric Taylor, Innovation Award; Eric Booher, Teamwork Award; Amy Keith, Dependability Award; and Debbie Hendon, Excellence Award. Contractor employees receiving awards were Craig Murdoch, Customer Service Award; Clark Lowery, Innovation Award; Marlene McElroy, Teamwork Award; Donna Robinson, Dependability Award; and Robin Bevels, Excellence Award. (NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)






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NASA Honors 52 Marshall Team Members with Silver Snoopy Award This Summer

Over the summer months, 52 Marshall Space Flight Center team members were honored in three separate ceremonies with the NASA Silver Snoopy award for their outstanding achievements related to human flight safety or mission success. The award is presented personally by NASA astronauts, as it represents the astronauts' own recognition of excellence. Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson also took part in each of the presentations. For more information on the award, visit here.

Eighteen Marshall Center team members were honored with Silver Snoopy awards in June by astronauts Lee J. Archambault and Stephen G. Bowen, along with Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson. Eighteen Marshall Center team members were honored with Silver Snoopy awards in June by astronauts Lee J. Archambault and Stephen G. Bowen, along with Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson, including David W. Cockrell, Stephen C. Gorum, Rosalynne L. Strickland and Christopher T. Reinecke, all of the Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate; Matthew K. Devine, M. Keith Smith and J. Todd Thompson, all of the Engineering Directorate; Sheldon D. Smith of the Jacobs Technology Engineering and Science Services and Skills Augmentation Group, supporting the Engineering Directorate; Vanessa P. Suggs of the Office of Human Capital; Karen P. Flanagan of the Office of the Chief Financial Officer; Rhonda W. Pepper of the Office of Center Operations; Collin M. Jackson and Casey Thompson, both of Boeing Co., supporting the Space Launch System Program; John M. Rowe and Shawn R. Salge, both of Boeing Co., supporting the Flight Programs & Partnerships Office; Sandra B. May of Marshall Information Technology Services/Dynetics Inc., supporting the Office of the Chief Information Officer; Holly W. Snow of Schafer Corp., supporting the Office of Strategic Analysis & Communications; and Shanda Williams of Al-Razaq Computing Services, supporting the Office of the Chief Financial Officer. (NASA/MSFC)

Astronauts Dominic Astronauts Dominic "Tony" Antonelli and Kate Rubins, along with Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson, honored 18 team members with Silver Snoopy awards in July, including Ronald R. Burwell, William Chad Hastings, Heather M. Koehler, Pablo D. Torres and Terry D. Ware, all of the Engineering Directorate; Danny Bobo Hand, Nikki M. Lowrey, Robert Edward Phillips, David W. Teague, all of the Jacobs Technology Engineering and Science Services and Skills Augmentation Group, supporting the Engineering Directorate; Teresa L. Lucas of Teledyne Brown Engineering, supporting the Engineering Directorate; Scott F. Finnegan and Sherry C. Huddleston, both of the Space Launch System Program; James L. Bell of the Office of Strategic Analysis & Communications; Stephen E. Elrod of the Science & Technology Office; Vann R. Jones of the Office of the Chief Information Officer; Amy G. Keith of the Office of Center Operations; Carol A. Lovell of the Shuttle-Ares Transition Office; and Kimberly D. O'Donnell of the Office of Procurement. (NASA/MSFC)

Astronaut TJ Creamer and Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson presented 16 Silver Snoopy awards to team members in August. Astronaut TJ Creamer and Marshall Associate Director Robin Henderson presented 16 Silver Snoopy awards to team members in August, including Joseph L. Butler, Rebecca A. Farr, Joseph L. Gaines, Kevin S. McCarley, John W. Redmon and Mark L. Talton, all of the Engineering Directorate; Tamra A. Ozbolt of Emerald City Initiatives Inc. and Michael Penton of Teledyne Brown Engineering, both supporting the Engineering Directorate; Lisa D. Coe and Jeremy D. Richard, both of the Space Launch System Program; Lou A. Fikes, Robert N. Fuerst and Bryan J. Simmons, all of the Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate; Linda M. Yarbrough of the Flight Programs & Partnerships Office; Scott Spearing of Geocent LLC, supporting the Flight Programs & Partnerships Office; and Aileen Yates of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, supporting the Office of Procurement. (NASA/MSFC)

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Note of Appreciation

To all my friends at NASA,
I would like to take this opportunity to thank each of you for being there for my mom, Irene Taylor, when she needed you most. The cards, flowers, food, visits, gifts and kind words, as well as your love and support were greatly appreciated. And to each of you who gave your hard-earned vacation as a donation for my mom, I pray that God will bless each one of you in a special way. Having the additional time off to deal with her illness, without worrying about her financial situation, was a blessing to her and allowed the remainder of her life to be more peaceful. I miss my mom, but realize that she is in a much better place than this world has to offer, and that her body had been made whole and is no longer ravaged by a disease called cancer. My commitment, as a tribute to my mom, is to attend Vanderbilt University and work toward the field of cancer research. In her memory, I desire to work to eliminate the need for hospice, chemo, hospitals and pain. Please pray for me as I walk the path that I feel God has directed me to follow.

I send not only my appreciation for your kindness, but also my love to each one of you. Again, I pray that God's blessings will flow on your lives, and His peace and joy will fill your heart.

I love you all!
Elizabeth Taylor