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Rep. Scott on STEM Education: "We've Got to Do Better"
04.15.13
 
En route back to D.C. from NASA's Langley Research Center, Rep. Scott (D-Va.) made a pit stop at the MathScience Innovation Center in Richmond, Va. during a NASA co-hosted workshop for middle and high school counselors. The workshop provided more than 50 counselors with resources that will encourage students to pursue STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) careers.

Rep. Scott (D-Va.) in Richmond.

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Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) spoke to more than 100 counselors during a NASA co-hosted workshop at the MathScience Innovation Center in Richmond. Credit: NASA/Donna Lawson

"We need to make sure we emphasize education," said Scott, who is serving his eleventh term in Congress. "The work you do with the students is so important."

The Congressman explained that he is working with NASA to emphasize the importance of STEM education.

"Our (US) competitive advantage will depend on our ability to educate our workforce," he said. "So many of you here are working with NASA and making sure that our students pursue college and STEM fields."

He said that it has been estimated that by 2015, 90 percent of jobs will be considered high-tech, and will require an education past the high school level.

When it comes to educating our students in STEM, Rep. Scott says "we've got to do better."

Congressman Scott currently serves on the Judiciary and Education and Workforce Committees. As a Member of the United States House of Representatives, he has made STEM education and the development of the future workforce a priority. He is also leading efforts to enact legislation designed to reduce high school dropout rates and increase access to a college education for all students.

His greetings and message from Washington were well received by the counselors who can pass his message on to the students in his district.

By: Denise Lineberry

The Researcher News
NASA Langley Research Center
Editor & Curator: Denise Lineberry
Executive Editor & Responsible NASA Official: Rob Wyman