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STORRM Team Recognized for Support of STS-134
07.28.10
 
Tom Johnson receives STORRM award.

Orion Deputy Project Manager Mark Kirasich (left) and Constellation manager Dale Thomas present Langley's Tom Johnson with a commendation. Credit: NASA.

It was a perfect STORRM. On Tuesday, July 20, NASA, and its industry partners Lockheed Martin Space Systems and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC), successfully demonstrated a new sensor technology that will make it easier and safer for spacecraft to dock to the International Space Station.

This docking system prototype consists of an eye-safe lidar Vision Navigation Sensor, or VNS, a high-definition docking camera, developed as well as the avionics and flight software. Both sensors will provide real-time three-dimensional images to the crew with a resolution 16 higher than the current shuttle sensors. This next generation system also provides data from as far away as three miles – three times the range of the shuttle docking system.

The STORRM Team participated in a VIP and an STS-134 astronaut crew demonstration of the STORRM hardware at BATC in Boulder, Colo. As part of the activities, the STORRM Team received several awards. Two members of the NASA Langley STORRM team received recognition for their support of the project:

Wade May receives STORMM award.

Orion Deputy Project Manager Mark Kirasich (left) and Constellation manager Dale Thomas present Langley's Chief STORRM engineer Wade May with a commendation. Credit: NASA.

Tom Johnson, SSAI/AI, was recognized for exceptional dedication in developing the Avionics Enclosure Assembly in support of the STORRM flight test.

Wade May was recognized for outstanding contributions leading the mechanical design and structural analysis of the Avionics Enclosure Assembly in support of the STORRM flight test.


In addition, the STORRM Development Test Objective (DTO) Team, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, Lockheed Martin and BATC, was presented a certificate for the exceptional support to develop, test and deliver the STORRM flight system for launch aboard STS-134.

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