Search Langley

Go

News Releases

Text Size

 
04.23.07
 
NOTE TO EDITORS : 07-020
 
 
NASA Langley Forecast
 
 
TOP NASA SPACE EXPLORATION OFFICIALS TO UPDATE PROGRAM
News crews are invited to a NASA Space Exploration Media Day Thursday, May 3, at NASA Langley Research Center. Since President George Bush announced the Vision for Space Exploration in 2004, preparing for journeys to the "moon, Mars and beyond" has topped NASA's priority list. Reporters attending the event in person will be briefed on Langley's contributions to the agency exploration program, be invited to participate in a live NASA TV briefing by top exploration officials and tour exploration-related sites on center.
For information, contact Keith Henry at 757-864-6120 or h.k.henry@nasa.gov

THE MOON, MARS AND BEYOND...IN A TRAILER?!
Take a ride into space with the help of a 53-foot-long tractor-trailer. The traveling "Vision for Space Exploration" exhibit gives visitors the tools and information they'll need to prepare for a journey to the moon and Mars, then the interactive experience sends them on a simulated journey into space. The Exploration Trailer will be open to the public free of charge at two local venues: Langley Air Force Base Air Show in Hampton, Va., April 27-29; and the Virginia Air & Space Center in Hampton, May 2-6.
For information, contact Lindsay Crouch at 757-864-3189 or l.m.crouch@larc.nasa.gov

400TH ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND SHOWCASES EXPLORERS - PAST AND PRESENT
NASA will play a big part in America's Anniversary Weekend May 11-13, the national observance of the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. The weekend will feature historical interpretations, demonstrations, musical performances and educational displays, including one from NASA. NASA's exhibit highlights connections between settlers in Virginia almost 400 years ago and NASA's plans to explore space and establish a presence on other worlds. Anniversary Weekend will also feature a special message from the crew of the International Space Station.
For information, contact Lindsay Crouch at 757-864-3189 or l.m.crouch@larc.nasa.gov

PIECE OF JAMESTOWN HISTORY TO GO INTO SPACE
A little piece of history is hitching a ride on the space shuttle Atlantis during its latest mission, STS-117. A lead cargo tag, dating back to the 1600s, is tucked inside a box in the shuttle's middeck floor. The tag is the only thing found in thirteen years of APVA Preservation Virginia archeological digs at Jamestown Island that contains the word "Yamestowne" on it. The tag's trip celebrates the link between explorers past and present. Atlantis is now scheduled to launch no earlier than June 8.
For more information call Kathy Barnstorff at 757/864-9886 or kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov.

WHY DO WE EXPLORE?
Humans have done it almost since the dawn of time … set off on journeys into the unknown. Sometimes it was to discover riches. Other times it's to uncover knowledge. But what's the real reason we're driven to go where no one has gone before? NASA historian Steven Dick will explore this topic on May 8 in two presentations, one for NASA employees in the afternoon at NASA Langley, the other for the public in the evening at the Virginia Air & Space Center. Reporters are invited to a news briefing with him at 1:15 p.m.
For more information call Marny Skora at 757/864-6121 or marny.skora@nasa.gov.

NASA PLANS SOME SLEDDING THIS SPRING
NASA is working to improve aviation safety by developing technologies that can diagnose and predict airplane problems before they happen. Researchers will use the world's fastest water-powered "sled" to test some of those technologies. Sensors are being attached to wheels, brakes and landing gear structure -- all part of NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamic Facility's sled. That sled can go almost instantaneously up to 230 miles an hour simulating the wear and failures on landing gear structure, landing gear systems, brakes, tires and wheels experienced during a real airplane landing.
For more information call Kathy Barnstorff at 757/864-9886 or kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov.

PUPPY GOES TO WORK
A female golden retriever puppy is in training at NASA's Langley Research Center. Aries, the dog, goes to work every day with her mentor, structural engineer Evan J. Horowitz. Horowitz is socializing her as part of the "Leader Dogs for the Blind" program. Aries will be at NASA for more than a year until she returns to Michigan for actual guide dog training. Video and interviews are available.
For more information call Kathy Barnstorff at 757/864-9886 or kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov.

NASA LANGLEY EMPLOYEE TRAVELS 'TO RUSSIA WITH LOVE'
NASA Langley employee Michael Finneran and his wife, Lisa, have taken up the cause of Russian orphans in a big way. Four years ago they adopted orphaned Russian twins. Now after visiting an estimated 1,000 orphans in the remote regions north of Moscow this winter, they are working with others on behalf of entire orphanages. Their goal is to help older Russian children who have little hope of being adopted. Russia has a crushing number of orphans. Officials say "orphan graduates" -- those 16 and over -- have a life expectancy of only 30. One in 10 will kill themselves and 40 percent become criminals. The Finnerans are working "to improve the odds for these children."
For information, contact Keith Henry at 757-864-6120 or h.k.henry@nasa.gov
 

- end -


text-only version of this release