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Kimberly W. Land
(Phone 757/864-9885, 757/344-8611 mobile)
k.w.land@larc.nasa.gov

RELEASE NO. 04-033
 


May 27, 2004

TUESDAY, JUNE 1
X-43: NASA SET SPEED RECORD

The desire to explore and expand our boundaries has been a key element in NASA's development of hypersonic air-breathing engine systems. And it has been for more than 40 years. At NASA Langley Research Center, wind tunnel tests have been conducted on more than 20 engine configurations.

Charles R. McClinton, senior researcher at NASA Langley, will speak on "X-43: Breaking the Hypersonic Barrier" at a colloquium at 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 1.

Media Briefing: A media briefing will be held at 1:15 p.m. at the H.J.E. Reid Conference Center, 14 Langley Blvd., NASA Langley Research Center. Members of the media who wish to attend should contact Kimberly W. Land at (757) 864-9885 or 344-8611 (mobile) to arrange for credentials.

McClinton will explain scramjet operation and design principles, highlight Virginia's contribution to scramjet and hypersonic vehicle development and present the agency's hypersonic vision.

NASA Langley has worked with the Russians and Australians in recent scramjet flight tests and, just this spring, NASA successfully tested the X-43; the first vehicle to fly under scramjet power over 500 miles, generating a wealth of unique data confirming scramjet capabilities.

Over the past four years, McClinton has played an instrumental role in planning hypersonic air-breathing technology development programs at NASA Langley, where he has worked since 1967. In 1996, he was selected as the Technology Manager for the Hyper-X program. He is responsible for the Hyper-X vehicle definition to meet mission requirements, delivery of government furnished items to the contractor teams, wind tunnel testing and hypersonic technology development.

In 1967, McClinton received a bachelor's of science degree in aerospace engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and, in 1971, a master's of science degree in mechanical engineering from George Washington University. He has over 18 years experience in wind tunnel testing of scramjet engines and components. He has authored numerous publications and has received an array of national awards.

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