Search Langley

Go

Text Size

 
 

For Release: Immediately
Release No. 96-145

NASA Langley Story Opportunities - August

Is There Any Clean Air Left On Earth? In a search for unpolluted air, NASA researchers will spend two months flying over the Central Pacific ocean. Researchers need to know how the atmosphere behaves without human influences in order to better understand the effects of human activities on the Earth's atmosphere. The Central Pacific is the focus of the Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM)-Tropics experiment because it is, perhaps, the last remaining region of the world's lower atmosphere that is relatively free of human-induced atmospheric pollution. NASA, in collaboration with NOAA and several universities and government agencies, will spearhead PEM-Tropics. Interviews and video are available.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONTACT: Catherine E. Watson (757) 864-6122

Understanding The Effects Of Crew Motions In Space. The Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors EDLS-Mir experiment is measuring how the movements of crew members aboard the Russian space station Mir affect the microgravity environment of the station. Everyday activities, such as opening and closing a locker door or moving from one work station to another, cause vibrations on the space station that can affect some of the more sensitive microgravity experiments. Interviews, illustration and video are available.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONTACT: Catherine E. Watson (757) 864-6122

Adaptive Aircraft Unveiled At Oshkosh. NASA and the Air Force unveiled a jet-powered remote-control aircraft in Oshkosh, Wis., on Aug. 2. The 8-foot 4-inch "LoFlyte" aircraft was built to demonstrate a computerized neural network flight control system that learns as it flies. Developed by Accurate Automation Corporation of Chattanooga, Tenn., under the Small Business Research program, the aircraft is of a hypersonic waverider configuration developed at Langley. The construction of the model has been completed at SWB Turbines in Appleton, Wis., and the aircraft will be flown subsonically in tests this month at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. Interviews, photos and video are available.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONTACT: Keith Henry (757) 864-6120

NASA Makes News At Oshkosh Fly-In. NASA announced two new aeronautics research programs, and updated two more, at the annual Experimental Aircraft Association convention in Oshkosh, Wis., Aug. 2 and Aug. 3:
-> Hypersonic - NASA unveiled a jet-powered test aircraft built to demonstrate flight control technologies that learn by mimicking the pilot. The 8-foot-4-inch remotely-controlled aircraft is a hypersonic configuration that will be flown subsonically in tests this month at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The program is managed by NASA Langley and the U.S. Air Force's Wright Labs. (See Adaptive Aircraft Story Opp. above)
-> General Aviation - NASA announced the creation of the General Aviation Propulsion program, managed by NASA Lewis Research Center. Set to begin Oct. 1, GAP will develop both reciprocal and turbine engine technology for light aircraft applications. NASA and the FAA reported on progress to revitalize the U.S. general aviation industry, including a demonstration of the latest flight systems technologies at the Atlanta Olympics.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONTACT: Keith Henry (757) 864-6120

NASA and FAA Announce General Aviation Design Competition Winners. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University captured first-place in the NASA/FAA 1996 National General Aviation Design Competition. Cash prizes were awarded at a ceremony held Aug. 3 at the annual Experimental Aircraft Association convention in Oshkosh, Wis. The second-place award was presented to three Kansas universities that worked together on a joint design project: the University of Kansas, Wichita State University and Kansas State University. Pennsylvania State University received third-place and a special award for Greatest Retrofit Potential was given to the design team from Ohio State University. The competition, which is in its second year, allows university students to participate in the national effort to revitalize the U.S. general aviation sector.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS CONTACT: Keith Henry (757) 864-6120

- end -

 

- end -


text-only version of this release