NASA Podcasts

Historic Recordings: KSC Report 32, Spaceport Visitor Information Center Opens
1967
 
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LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
Five... four...

Sound of rockets engine

NARRATOR:
KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

Sound of rockets engine

NARRATOR:
Two vacationing families from different towns in Ohio received special welcomes when they came to the Kennedy Space Center for a look at the nation's spaceport this week. Mr. and Mrs. Gene Santavicca of Willowick, Ohio, were the first tourists to arrive at a new visitor information center on its opening day. As they looked over the exhibits, displays, paintings and models that tell the story of our national space program, the Sanatviccas were asked for their reaction to this new visitor facility.

SANTAVICCA:
Oh, I think it's amazing. It's really, really got a lot of stuff here. This model over here is really sharp. We just went in and seen a movie over here. It's really fine. It's a real nice place.

MRS. SANTAVICCA:
I think it's beautiful. I think everybody ought to come down and take a look at it and see where their money is going. I'm surprised myself that there's this much here. I think it's nice.

NARRATOR:
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jackson of Sabina, Ohio, were surprised to learn that he was the five hundred thousandth visitor to take the guided bus tour of the spaceport . The Jacksons were presented a color photograph of the Vehicle Assembly Building by KSC's deputy director, Albert Siepert.

SIEPERT:
This particular building, which is the world's largest single structure, this is where we are going to check out the Saturn V rocket. You will be going in this side of the building later today. And so we've inscribed it here to you folks, signed by Dr. Debus, the director.

JACKSON:
That's just beautiful. Thank you very, very much.

SIEPERT:
You're welcome.

JACKSON:
Sure appreciate it.

NARRATOR:
A special guest at the visitor center dedication was former Congressman Walter Riehlman, a member of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics that authorized its construction so that the public might have a better opportunity to learn what their tax dollars are buying in the space program.

RIEHLMAN:
They're spending something over five billion dollars a year in supporting this program, and as taxpayers, they're entitled to as much information as can possibly be given to them. And one of the best ways is through visual -- illustrations and demonstrations -- and we're going to have those in this new building.

NARRATOR:
The director of Kennedy Space Center, Dr. Kurt Debus, extended a cordial welcome to the public to visit the new information center and tour the actual launch sites aboard the air conditioned NASA tour buses.

DEBUS:
The confrontation with the actual hardware here, with the activities, with the people that make it work, has brought us many supporters that previously were not really in effect supporting this program. Here is the place where the taxpayers' dollars is converted in substance of a space frontier, of a space program, and here then it is that we can make the public see what actually it is that they are supporting and make every voter of every congressional district across this country, and even on an international scale, familiar what this effort looks like and give him a person-to-person feeling with this effort that has been called space.

LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
"Five... four..."

Sound of rockets engine

NARRATOR:
This has been KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

 
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