Frequently Asked Questions

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Q. How can I contact Kennedy Space Center?
Q. What address can I use for the Kennedy Space Center?
Q. Where can I find more technical information on NASA's research?
Q. Can I become a member of a NASA club or have my name put on a mailing list?
Q. Please describe the meaning of the STS-107 patch.
Q. How can I request Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) data?
Q. How can I get a KSC flown flag?
Q. How can I get on the mailing list for the Spaceport News?
Q. Where can I get NASA space hardware?
Q. Where can I get permission to use the NASA logo or other NASA materials?
Q. How can I submit a grant proposal to NASA?
Q. How does NASA cooperate with other countries in carrying out space projects?
Q. How can I find out more about astronomy?
Q. I'd like to do business with NASA where should I start?


Q. How can I contact Kennedy Space Center?
A. You can call Kennedy Space Center, and speak to a LIVE operator. The number is (321) 867-5000.


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Q. What address can I use for the Kennedy Space Center?
A. The Kennedy Space Center itself does not actually have a physical address because it is comprised of many facilities spread out over 144,000 acres. It does have its own postal zip code of 32899. The Visitor Complex is located off State Road 405 on Kennedy Space Center property. There are directions to Kennedy Space Center and the Visitor's Complex listed at the Web site below:

+ Maps and Directions


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Q. Where can I find more technical information on NASA's research?
A. Requests for NASA technical publications and papers should be directed to NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Web site.

+ STI Web site


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Q. Can I become a member of a NASA club or have my name put on a mailing list?
A. NASA does not maintain public mailing lists nor does it sponsor a space club. However, NASA press releases can be obtained automatically by sending an e-mail to domo@hq.nasa.gov with the following in the body: subscribe press-release. Leave the subject line blank. The system will reply with an e-mail confirmation of each subscription. A second automatic message will include additional information on the service.

The NASA Public Affairs Web site is located at the link listed below. The NASA Headquarters Newsroom contains NASA news releases, mission press kits, fact sheets and other publications.

+ NASA Public Affairs


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Q. Please describe the meaning of the STS-107 patch.
A. The central element of the patch is the microgravity symbol, µg, flowing into the rays of the astronaut symbol The sunrise is representative of the numerous experiments that are the dawn of a new era for continued microgravity research on the International Space Station and beyond.

STS-107 was a multidiscipline microgravity and Earth science research mission with a multitude of international scientific investigations conducted continuously during the planned 16 days on orbit.

A complete description is available by clicking on the STS-107 Mission imagery link.

+ STS-107 Mission Imagery


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Q. How can I request Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) data?
A. Individuals seeking NASA Kennedy Space Center records must do so by submitting a written request pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. The FOIA request must be in writing. No telephone requests will be accepted. If you do not know the exact title of the document you are seeking, you should provide a reasonable description of the documents. The more information that you can provide about the document, such as its author or date, the quicker your request will be processed. Your request will be logged and a tracking number assigned to it. The tracking number assigned is of great importance to you as a requester because, in the event you would like to check the status of your request, the number enables us to locate where in the process your request is.

Please send your request to Kennedy Space Center by mail, fax or email to the address below.

John F. Kennedy Space Center
Attn: PA-A1/Freedom of Information Act Office
Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899
Fax: (321) 867-2692
E-mail: FOIA@ksc.nasa.gov

NOTE: You should submit your request to the FOIA Office at the NASA Center that authored the documents or the Inspector General's FOIA Office at NASA Headquarters for all Inspector General documents. If you do not know which NASA Center to contact, then you may submit it to NASA Headquarters at their website link below:

+ NASA FOIA
+ Kennedy FOIA


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Q. How can I get a flag flown at KSC?
A. Kennedy Space Center flown flags are presented by National Aeronautics and Space Administration management during Official Kennedy U.S. Flag presentations to family members of deceased employees who died while employed by NASA and in recognition of service to NASA.

In order to submit a request, you must provide the following information to the NASA Security Office, TA-A2
E-mail: dann.e.oakland@nasa.gov

  -   Name of Deceased Employee
  -   Date of Death
  -   Job Description of Deceased Employee and NASA Directorate or Company
  -   Supervisors Name and Phone Number of Deceased Employee
  -   Date and Place of Memorial Service and where burial/cremation will take place
  -   Next of Kin's Name and Address and Phone Number

NASA Security will place the appropriate notices in the KSC Daily News.

The supervisor will notified when and where the flown flag can be picked up.

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Q. How can I get on the mailing list for the Spaceport News?
A. Kennedy Space Center's Spaceport News is available online. Please click on the link below to access current and past Issues.

+ Spaceport News
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Q. Where can I get NASA space hardware?
A. Moon rocks, samples of space food, telescopes, old space suits, discarded Shuttle tiles and other used hardware are not available to the public. By agreement, the Smithsonian Institute has right of first refusal on artifacts NASA no longer wishes to keep. Those artifacts then become the property of the Smithsonian.

Blueprints, flight plans, briefing papers and other materials are printed in limited quantities for distribution only to working personnel who require them.

Most items of value that NASA no longer needs are offered first to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, or to other science museums. These objects are sometimes available for loan to qualified institutions.


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Q. Where can I get permission to use the NASA logo or other NASA materials?
A. For information regarding the use of the NASA logo, please write to:

Public Services Division/Office of Public Affairs
NASA Headquarters, Code POS
Washington, DC 20546


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Q. How can I submit a grant proposal to NASA?
A. NASA depends on the private sector -- individuals, industry, educational institutions and other nonprofit organizations -- for the greater part of its research needs. Therefore, NASA encourages the submission of unique and innovative unsolicited proposals which will further the Agency's mission.

NASA provides guidance for the preparation and submission of unsolicited proposals at the website link listed below:

At the end of this document, information is provided which gives insight into NASA's specific current and anticipated research goals, and science or engineering topics that may be of interest to NASA.

+ Unsolicited Proposals


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Q. How does NASA cooperate with other countries in carrying out space projects?
A. International cooperation has been a fundamental part of NASA since the agency was formed in 1958. Over the years, NASA has signed more than 1,200 agreements with more than 135 countries and international organizations. This cooperation ranges from shared scientific data and joint research to construction of space hardware and orbital rendezvous, like the Apollo-Soyuz docking in 1975 and visits of Space Shuttles to the Russian Mir space station, which began in 1995.

The International Space Station is one of the largest high-tech cooperative ventures ever, with formal participation by the United States, Russia, Canada, Japan and 11 nations of the European Space Agency and Brazil. Joint programs allow each country to contribute its individual expertise. They also foster an increased understanding of different cultures, leading to more peaceful and productive relations between the people of the countries as a whole. In many cases, the pooled resources and shared funding inherent in most international cooperation enable missions that would be too difficult or too costly for nations to accomplish individually.


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Q. How can I find out more about astronomy?
A. Click on the link below to access NASA JPL's amateur astronomy page.

+ JPL Astronomy


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Q. I'd like to do business with NASA where should I start?
For general procurement procedures, contract opportunities, research opportunities, and small business programs, please refer to the Web site link below.

+ NASA Business Opportunities


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