NASA Podcasts

Historic Recordings: KSC Reports 37, Doubleheader Launches
Launch Commentators Jack King and Chuck Hollinshead
Sept. 7, 1967
 
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Sound of rocket engines firing

LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
"Five... four..."

NARRATOR:
KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

Sound of rocket

NARRATOR:
Kennedy Space Center launch crews this week successfully sent two powerful rockets into space within a 10-hour period. The first launch came just after six o'clock in the evening, September 7th. KSC Public Information Officer Jack King counted the final seconds before launch of the Delta rocket

KING:
T minus 10...nine...8...7...6 ...5...4...3...2...1...zero. We have ignition. We have liftoff. Liftoff at four minutes past the hour.

Sound of rocket

NARRATOR:
The Delta rocket roared spaceward from the launch pad carrying a biosatellite to orbit around the Earth. Onboard the spacecraft was a cargo of frog eggs, bacteria, flower beetles, wasps, vinegar gnats, amoeba, bread mold, wheat seedlings, pepper plants and common wild flowers. The effects of weightlessness and radiation in space on these biological specimens will be studied in 13 experiments conducted during the three days the spacecraft was scheduled to circle the Earth, 196 miles above the surface. The experiment results are expected to supply new insight into life processes here on Earth, and knowledge needed for extended manned missions in space.

A second three-day space voyage began just 10 hours after the successful biosatellite launch. This time, the destination was the moon, a quarter-million miles away. The final minute of the countdown for the Atlas Centaur launch vehicle was described by Chuck Hollinshead of the KSC Public Information Office.

HOLLINSHEAD/LAUNCH CONTROL AUDIO:
One minute. Go ...seconds and counting. Switch on. The Atlas vehicle has been placed on internal power and the command destruct system and Surveyor (inaudible) ...armed. (inaudible) We're standing by for word on the liquid hydrogen topping in Centaur has been secured. The spacecraft is in a "go" condition and we've received clearance to launch from the range. (inaudible) Now have word that the Centaur liquid hydrogen and LOX topping has been (unintelligible) T-52 seconds and counting. Programmers to arm. 45 seconds. Minus 35. Minus 30. Status check Apollo. Minus 30 seconds and counting. T-30 seconds and counting. Launch director "go." ...check is being made at this time and the launch director is "go" for launch. (inaudible) T-minus 10...9...8...7...6...5...4...3...2...1...we have ignition. We have liftoff. At 3:57:01, 3:57:01 and we have liftoff. The roll program is in... (inaudible) and our flight looks good at this point. The roll pitch program... (inaudible)

NARRATOR:
Centaur sent the Surveyor 5 spacecraft headed toward its target landing area, in a relatively smooth area in the moon's Sea of Tranquility. This Surveyor spacecraft, like two earlier ones that soft landed on the lunar surface, carries a television camera to provide close-up pictures of a potential landing site for Apollo astronauts. This Surveyor also has a small bar magnet to collect any iron particles of the soil, and an instrument to study the chemical characteristics of the surface where the spacecraft is resting. The basic information radioed back to Earth by Surveyor will be used in the planning of manned missions to our nearest neighbor in space.

LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
"Five...four..."

Sound of rocket engines firing

NARRATOR:
This has been KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

 
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