NASA Podcasts

Historic Recordings: KSC Report 33, Interview with Civil Engineer Jeanette Jones
1967
 
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LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
"Five... four..."

Sound of rocket engines firing

NARRATOR:
KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

Sound of rocket

NARRATOR:
Women play important roles on the government industry team at the Kennedy Space Center. In additional to hundreds of clerical and secretarial positions, women with scientific and engineering education and experience are working alongside their male counterparts on technical assignments vital to the preparation and launch of space missions. Mrs. Jeannette Jones has a civil engineering degree from the University of Tennessee. After graduation, she went to work at the Oakridge, Tennessee National Laboratory. Three-and-a-half years ago, she transferred to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to work in tech management at the spaceport. Her present job is with the center's Information Systems Directorate.

JONES:
We provide ground support equipment for the vehicles. This includes telemetry, tracking, business and scientific computations. All ground support measurements such as hazards monitoring, lightning and so forth. We provide management support for all of these areas. This may include manpower studies, budget, cost reduction program, presentation support, any way that we can help the other areas, the other functions, in any type of support that we may provide for them.

NARRATOR:
The most demanding project that Mrs. Jones has been involved with was a comprehensive Apollo Program cost study where she was called upon to apply her knowledge and experience to predictions about the future.

JONES:
This involved making an estimate for the next five years of how much it would cost our directorate to support the schedule for the Apollo launches between now and 1972 -- how many hours, how much overtime -- the closer the launches are how much more it's going to cost.

NARRATOR:
Like every engineer working at the spaceport, Mrs. Jones is continually gaining new, practical knowledge in her chosen profession.

JONES:
One of the most interesting aspects of working at the Kennedy Space Center is the fact that I have acquired a new and unusual vocabulary, one that was different from the one that I use at Oakridge National Research. Such words as telemetry, o-dot tracking, continuous wave, prototype systems, words that are very common and ordinary in this area were unheard of before I came here. I had to learn these words completely and learn to use them in a familiar, ordinary type of conversation. This is just part of the fact, and the interesting fact, that the whole area is new and progressing and setting their own, their own mode of living, their own way of doing things here. We have... there's no state of the art, in fact we are setting our state of the art. We have no textbooks, no one to rely upon except the people who are working here, and can learn by doing. And I'm very proud of the accomplishments of Kennedy Space Center as I know other citizens of the United States are.

LAUNCH COMMENTATOR:
"Five...four..."

Sound of rocket engines firing

NARRATOR:
This has been KSC Reports... a weekly coverage of events at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center.

 
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