Education

Sun Educator Conference
09.21.09
 
3D image of sunSTEREO took this 3D image of the sun. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/NRL/GSFC
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The sun is the most prominent and vital feature in our solar system. It is the largest object and contains approximately 98 percent of the total mass of the solar system. Since their launch in 1977, the twin Voyagers’ primary objective was to explore and study the gas giants. In 1989 both Voyagers then became a heliospheric observation mission measuring the extent of the sun’s influence. Voyager 1 crossed into a region at the outer edge of our solar system in 2004, followed by Voyager 2 in 2007. In 1990, NASA launched the Ulysses mission whose goal was to explore the sun during solar maximum, providing us with a wealth of data that has led to a much broader understanding of the global structure of the sun’s environment and the heliosphere. In 2004, NASA’s Genesis sample return mission brought back a treasure trove of data collected at the Lagrange 1 point and furthered our understanding of solar wind and improved upon the data set previously collected by the Apollo missions.

During this day-long conference, experts from the Voyager, Ulysses, Genesis, STEREO and Earth-exploring missions will be on hand to discuss the structure and content of the sun; current study of its composition; solar cycles; the importance of the sun to Earth; and the inner and outer heliosphere. We will discuss and demonstrate activities that you can use in your classroom to promote a greater appreciation of the inspirational aspects of space exploration.

Who: All educators (including museum staff) interested in Earth and space science, and exploration. The conference content is generally non-technical but does include some scientific and engineering content. The objective of the conference is to tell the exciting tales of real-life exploration and new discovery in a way that will excite and inspire students.

When: All day, Saturday, October 17. Check-in begins at 7:45 a.m. The conference will conclude by 5:00 pm.

Where: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s von Karman Auditorium. JPL is located in the foothills of the San Gabriel’s Mountains, north of the Rose Bowl. For directions please visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/about_JPL/maps.cfm.

Pre-registration is required; walk-up registration will not be possible for this conference. Note that you will need to show a photo ID at JPL’s security checkpoint upon arrival.

How: To register for this conference, please send a check postmarked by Monday, October 5, 2009, for $25 payable to:

"Jet Propulsion Laboratory" Sun Educator Conference
Attn: Glenda Sherman
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
M/S 600-100
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109

Please register by Monday, October 5, 2009. The $25.00 registration fee includes continental breakfast, refreshments at breaks and lunch. For registration questions, please call/contact Andrea Angrum (andrea.angrum@jpl.nasa.gov) at (818) 354-6775 or Aimee Meyer (aimee.l.meyer@jpl.nasa.gov) at (818) 354-3245. For updates and information visit the JPL Education Gateway at http://education.jpl.nasa.gov/.


Name________________________________________
Title_________________________________________
Organization/School_________________________________________________
Address_______________________________________ State____ Zip________
Grade(s) Taught/Enrolled_____________________________________________
Subject(s) Taught/Enrolled____________________________________________
Contact info for confirmation & last minute changes:
E-mail: ________________________________
Phone: ________________________________

Please enclose $25 Registration Fee. Check # ____________