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Aerospace Medicine Research Rotation
September 23, 2013

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*Please be aware that as of September 18, 2013, we are unable to accept applicants for the Aerospace Medicine Research Rotation until further notice.*

Work Tour Description

The four week Aerospace Medicine Research Rotation is offered monthly and typically begins the first Monday and concludes on the last Friday of the month. The rotation involves participation in a research project in a current focus area of The Exploration Medical Capability Element under the supervision of a physician mentor. At the conclusion of the rotation, the research project will be presented both orally and in written format to the Johnson Space Center’s Human Health and Performance community.
Eligibility Requirements Interested persons must be medical students or residents, graduate level nursing students, or graduate students in other related fields with an interest in Aerospace Medicine.

Application and Selection Process

In addition to the application, a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, letter of good standing / recommendation from the school or institution, requirements from your school or institution, and official transcript from the graduate school are required. Applications are due six months prior to date you are applying for. See application for more information.

Upon completion of the application period, up to two students will be selected for each of the research rotations by a committee of NASA flight surgeons and other Space and Clinical Operations team members. Selection is based upon interest and career goals in Aerospace Medicine, academic standing, content of a Dean's recommendation, research, and work experience.

Logistics of the Rotation

If selected, to assist with lodging, you will be supplied with a listing of NASA and contractor personnel who have rooms to rent as well as local hotels and extended stays.

You will be supplied with a workstation either at Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering (Wyle) or at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), including a phone and computer to be used for research purposes.

Participants are responsible for their own transportation during the rotation. Please note that there is very little to no public transportation in the area between workstation sites and Johnson Space Center (JSC).

It is strongly encouraged that International students obtain a vehicle for the length of the rotation as they will be located at the University of Texas Medical Branch.

All costs incurred during the rotation are your responsibility. No monies are provided by JSC, UTMB, or Wyle.

During The Rotation

The project that will be assigned to you will be related to the work done by the Exploration Medical Capability Element. The Exploration Medical Capability Element of the NASA Human Research Program is tasked with reducing the risk of the “unacceptable heath and mission outcomes due to limitations of in-flight medical capabilities.” To this end, the Element seeks to address identified gaps in knowledge or technology to ensure that the desired medical capabilities will be available for exploration missions.

The exploration missions objectives present significant new challenges to crew health care capabilities. These challenges include the hazards created by the terrain of lunar or planetary surfaces that may be difficult to traverse during exploration, the effects of gravity transitions, low gravity environments, and limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation. Each challenge has associated medical implications and medical requirements and technologies to ensure safety and success.

Activities will include one-on-one time with your physician preceptor, as well as time for you to work on the project assigned to you.

If any special events are to occur during the rotation, time is usually set aside for the research rotation participants to attend, but would be considered optional.

There will be NO patient or clinic interaction during this research rotation.

Additional Information:

To learn more about the NASA Human Research Program, the Exploration Medical Capability Element, and the Exploration Medical Capability Element’s existing gaps please visit these websites:

http://Humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov

http://humanresearchwiki.jsc.nasa.gov

Q. How are Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group (Wyle) and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) involved with The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element?

A. The Exploration Medical Capability Element of the NASA Human Research Program is charged with reducing the risk of the “unacceptable heath and mission outcomes due to limitations of in-flight medical capabilities.” To this end, the Element seeks to address identified gaps in knowledge or technology to ensure that the desired medical capabilities will be available for exploration missions.

The Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group (Wyle), with more than 40 years of experience, is the recognized leader in life sciences research, space medical operations and engineering for the enhancement of human performance and safety in air and space.

The Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health (PMCH) is the academic unit within the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) that focuses on promoting human health and function through the integration of disease prevention and health promotion services, public health and population health sciences, and clinical sciences.

Wyle and UTMB are partners on the Bioastronautics contract to Johnson Space Center that provides support to the Exploration Medical Capability Element.

Mail application to:

Elisca Hicks
Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center
Mail Code SD222
2101 NASA Parkway
Houston, Texas 77058
+ Aerospace Medicine Research Rotation

*Please be aware that as of September 18, 2013, we are unable to accept applicants for the Aerospace Medicine Research Rotation until further notice.*

Questions/Concerns:

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Elisca Hicks at 281-244-6844 or( elisca.m.hicks@nasa.gov ).

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Page Last Updated: September 24th, 2013
Page Editor: Jeffrey Brief