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Goddard Symposium, 47 Years Old and Premiere AAS Event
02.15.08
 
What began as a meeting of stakeholders for a pioneering industry has evolved to become a premiere event in the Washington, D.C. area sponsored by the American Astronautical Society (AAS). The annual Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium 47 years later continues to attract NASA, aerospace and academic leaders as well as members of Congress to present and discuss space exploration.

The first Goddard symposium was held 1961 in conjunction with the National Space Club’s annual Goddard Dinner. The theme that year was “Interaction of Space Vehicles with an Ionized Atmosphere.” That first meeting was enthusiastically supported by Mrs. Robert Goddard.

The symposium soon became an annual event and themes gradually evolved from strictly technical to more general topics of interest to the civil space community. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center began officially supporting the symposium in 1997 with prepaid registration for Center personnel to attend.

“Today the goal is to continue bringing together leaders in government, industry, academia, and entrepreneurs to consider the history and current state of space exploration and commercialization,” said James Kirkpatrick, Executive Director, AAS. “Collectively there will be discussion about new plans and prospects for the future of humanity in space. It is also an excellent opportunity for anyone in the industry to gain a better understanding about what is evolving within the aerospace industry.”

For the 46th Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium to be held March 4-6, 2008 at the Greenbelt Marriott Hotel the theme will be “Exploration to Commercialization: Going to Work in Space.” On the eve of NASA turning 50, NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin will talk about NASA’s current vision of returning to the moon while preparing to journey to Mars and beyond. Other presentations will include humans working in space, the emerging space adventure industry, and spaceports and commercial space launches. You can view the complete 2008 program at www.astronautical.org.

New for this year, the symposium has also scheduled a Young Professionals Networking Reception, as the kick-off event on the evening of March 4. All receptions and the two-day symposium are open to the Goddard civil servant community. You do not need to register but you will need to bring your employee badge and sign in. Tickets are available for purchase if you would like to attend the luncheons.

The Goddard symposium also recognizes major anniversaries such as Robert Goddard’s first liquid rocket flight, the launch of Sputnik, the establishment of NASA and the Goddard Space Flight Center. This year’s recognition will include the Vanguard mission and Goddard’s support work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which earned former Vice President Al Gore the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.




“Exploration to Commercialization: Going to Work in Space” is the theme of the American Astronautical Society’s 46th Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium, to be held March 4-6, 2008 at the Greenbelt Marriott Hotel in Greenbelt, Maryland. The conference will provide a forum for managers, engineers, scientists and policy makers to hear first hand from senior NASA and industry leaders who will consider the history and current state of space exploration and commercialization, and collectively discuss new plans and prospects for the future of humanity in space. the direction in which NASA is moving and what it may mean to stakeholders in industry, government, academia and the science community.

Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator will provide the kick-off keynote address on March 5, and Alan Stern, Associate Administrator for Science, will provide the keynote address on March 6.

The two-day symposium will kick-off with a Young Professionals Networking Reception on the evening of March 4, which will be open to all attendees. Following Dr. Griffin’s keynote speech on March 5, conference attendees will hear presentations on NASA’s 50 year history, humans working in space, encouraging commercial space capabilities and emerging markets, the emerging space adventure industry, and spaceports and commercial space launches.

Following Dr. John Marburger III’s keynote on March 6, topics will include Earth science from space, investing in technology, Moon science, the Hubble Servicing Mission, space weather, Mars and planetary science, and the big questions in astrophysics. Dr. Marburge is science adviser to the president and director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The complete conference program and on-line registration are posted at www.astronautical.org. Members of the Press are welcome to attend all sessions at no charge.

 
 
Dewayne Washington
Goddard Space Flight Center