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Katherine K. Martin
Glenn Research Center, Cleveland
216-433-2406
katherine.martin@grc.nasa.gov

Kim Newton
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
kimberly.d.newton@nasa.gov

October 12, 2007
 
RELEASE : 07-042
 
 
Visionary NASA Exhibit to Visit Adams High School as Part of 3-Stop State Tour
 
 
CLEVELAND -- America's plans for opening the space frontier -- including new human exploration of Earth's moon and future voyages to Mars and beyond -- are featured in an interactive exhibit now touring Indiana, and scheduled to visit South Bend, Evansville and Purdue University this month.

During its stay in South Bend, the exhibit will be at Adams High School on October 15, 16 and 17. It will be open to the public at 5 p.m. each day, with the last show to begin at 7:45 p.m. The exhibit trailer will be in the Faculty Lot, south off of Mishawaka Avenue.

"The 'Vision for Space Exploration Experience' traveling exhibit is intended to give visitors a vivid glimpse into the nation's ambitious future in space," said John M. Hairston, Jr., director of external programs at NASA's Glenn Research Center. "The multimedia experience demonstrates how space exploration fosters inspiration, innovation and discovery creating a better future for all of us," Hairston said.

During the exhibit's stop in South Bend, Glenn Aerospace Engineer Mark Klem will speak at the University of Notre Dame on October 15 at 7:30 p.m. on the first floor of the Jordan Hall of Science. Klem is the Project Manager for the Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development Project at Glenn. He will speak about NASA's work to develop the technology needed for the future vehicle that will return to the moon as part of the agency's Vision for Space Exploration.

Additionally, Klem will speak on October 16 at the South Bend Rotary Club at noon and St. Joseph's High School at 2 p.m.

Notre Dame's Associate Professor of Physics Peter Garnavich will also give a presentation that will include Notre Dame's research efforts at the Large Binocular Telescope. The evening will conclude with a 20-minute presentation in Jordan's Digital Visualization Theatre.

"Exhibit visitors can learn how our quality of life may change as America continues to refine existing technologies and develop new breakthroughs in power, computer technologies, communications, networking and robotics," Klem said.

After its stop in South Bend, the "Vision for Space Exploration Experience" exhibit continues its 3-stop state tour at the Evansville Museum of History and Science, and Purdue University in West Lafayette. Specific dates and times the exhibit is available are listed below:

Evansville:
Saturday, October 20; exhibit opens at 10 a.m. and last show is at 4:45 p.m.
Sunday, October 21; exhibit opens at noon and last show is at 4:45 p.m.
Monday, October 22; exhibit opens at 9 a.m. and last show is at 2:45 p.m.

Purdue:
Friday, October 26; exhibit opens at 10 a.m. and last show is at 2:45 p.m.
Saturday, October 27; exhibit opens at 11 a.m. and last show is at 6:45 p.m.
Sunday, October 28; exhibit opens at 11 a.m. and last show is at 6:45 p.m.
Monday, October 29; exhibit opens at 3 p.m. and last show is at 6:45 p.m.

NASA staffers will be on hand to answer questions and discuss some of the thousands of technologies used on Earth as a result of years of space-based research and development by the agency and its partners.

Touring the "Vision for Space Exploration Experience" takes approximately 10 minutes. The exhibit is free and wheelchair accessible.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville, Ala., manages the traveling exhibit for the agency's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate in Washington. NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland is responsible for the agency's external programs within a six-state area that includes Indiana.

For more information about NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

http://exploration.nasa.gov

 

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