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01-037
For Release: May 14, 2001

Katherine K. Martin
Media Relations Office
216/433-2406
katherine.martin@grc.nasa.gov

Lori J. Rachul
Media Relations Office
216/433-8806
lori.j.rachul@grc.nasa.gov


Facility Tour Celebrates NASA Glen's Anniversary

A behind the scenes look at Cleveland's world class research facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, will take place Saturday, May 19, as part of Glenn's 60th anniversary celebration.

This month's tour features the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL), commonly known as the "dome." The AAPL, Glenn's geodesic style facility, provides state-of-the-art research capabilities in testing noise reduction methods. The tours will start at 11 a.m. and continue at half hour intervals through 2 p.m. Additional monthly tours of selected Glenn facilities are planned throughout the summer.

The AAPL is an acoustically treated geodesic dome that houses three testing rigs: the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR), the Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) and the Powered Lift Rig (PLR). The 130-foot-diameter dome is 65-feet-high and acts as a noise barrier, which buffers adjacent Glenn buildings and surrounding residential communities from the high levels of noise produced by the rigs.

The NATR is a 53-inch-diameter ejector-driven freejet with an airstream velocity of Mach 0.3, or 230 miles per hour. It provides an environment to evaluate high-speed exhaust nozzles for thrust and acoustic performance under simulated takeoff conditions. The ANCF is a testbed used to evaluate noise reduction techniques using active control methods, including a fan test section that can be rotated up to 2200 rpm by a 125-hp motor. The PLR is used to develop a technology base for Short Take Off Vertical Landing propulsion systems.

Two brief videotapes highlighting work done in the AAPL will be shown, displays will be exhibited, and a number of research engineers will be on hand to talk with visitors. Also included in the tour will be the new Laser Diagnostic capability and the ANCF rig.

The special tours are being coordinated through Glenn's Visitor Center and are part of the public tours conducted every Wednesday and third Saturday of each month. Tickets for this free event will be handed out on Saturday, May 19, at the Visitor Center, on a first come, first served basis. Children under the age of 13 must be accompanied by an adult. The Visitor Center is open on Saturday from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Both the Visitor Center and tour facility are wheelchair accessible

During its 60 years, Glenn has focused on propulsion systems, or the turbomachinery that propels airplanes and rockets forward and upward. Initially a laboratory for the improvement of airplane engines, the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory, as Glenn was known then, provided the technical knowledge and support for the Air Force and the Allied war effort. Aircraft icing studies enabled wartime planes to fly the Burma Hump over the Himalayan Mountains into China. Formally renamed in 1999 as Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, Glenn provides Northeast Ohio with thousands of jobs in technical fields and develops technology for U.S. industry, resulting in major advances in commercial products used in the air, in space and on the ground.

For more information about the AAPL, see: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/Aapl/

For information about Glenn's Visitor Center, see: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/Doc/visitgrc.htm

For information about Glenn's history, see: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/PAO/html/history.htm

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