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NASA Lewis News in Brief

First Quarter of 1996

Media inquiries should be direct to the Media Relations Office at 216/433-2901.

NASA LEWIS MICROGRAVITY EXPERIMENTS ARE PRIME CUSTOMER

When the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-75) launched in February 1996, NASA's Lewis Research Center provided two of the four major microgravity experiments; all three of the microgravity combustion experiments and two acceleration measurement devices to characterize the microgravity environment during flight. The NASA Lewis experiments, which were part of the third United States Microgravity Payload, will help researchers gain a better understanding of materials science and condensed matter physics.

NASA LEWIS DIRECTOR IS APPOINTED CHAIRPERSON OF CLEVELAND FEDERAL EXECUTIVE BOARD

NASA Lewis Director Donald J. Campbell recently was sworn in as Chairperson of the Cleveland Federal Executive Board (FEB). During his two-year appointment as chairperson, Campbell will initiate a leadership program to build the pool of federal leaders, and complete a strategic plan for the FEB. Campbell has been the Director of NASA Lewis since January 1994.

SCIENCE FAIR INSPIRES YOUNG ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS

Ten NASA Lewis engineers and technicians served as mentors to 100 students at East Technical High School for the school's 7th annual science fair. Additionally, more than 40 NASA Lewis employees volunteered to judge the student's projects. The science fair was created to give students the opportunity to research and develop projects that pertain to science and engineering. For 16 years the NASA Lewis Educational Programs Office has actively engaged in a partnership with East Tech as part of the NASA/East Tech Partners in Education Program. The program is designed to improve student academic achievement and teacher/parent involve- ment to facilitate decisions regarding careers in science, engineering and technology.

NASA SELECTS GE AIRCRAFT ENGINES FOR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

NASA Lewis has awarded a $61.8 million five-year contract to General Electric (GE) Aircraft Engines of Cincinnati, OH, to devel- op critical technologies for the next generation of U.S. subsonic commercial engines. Contract results are expected to provide the technical data to address pending emission and noise regulations that will impact large engines (20,000 to 100,000 lb. thrust) on 21st century commercial transport aircraft.

EMPLOYEES GIVE GENEROUSLY TO THE COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN

NASA Lewis employees contributed over $362,000 to the 1995 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), exceeding the Center's $350,000 goal. Funds raised through the CFC help charitable organizations at the local, national, and international level. In the Greater Cleveland area alone, over $1.3 million was contributed to this year's campaign.

TECHNOLOGY COULD IMPROVE BIOMEDICAL IMPLANT PERFORMANCE

A group of NASA Lewis researchers have developed a microtexturing technique that could improve the body's ability to accept biomedical implants. A spinoff of an ion bombardment technique originally developed for the Cassini Mission to Saturn, this new technique creates a deeply ridged microtexture, which when applied to biomedical implants can help bone and connective tissue cells take hold. NASA Lewis researchers have teamed with Cleveland Clinic Foundation specialists to test this new technique.

TESTS MAY YIELD INSIGHT INTO SEVERE WEATHER EFFECTS ON AIRCRAFT

NASA Lewis recently simulated severe weather conditions--rain, ice and lightning--in its Icing Research Tunnel for a program aimed at improving flight safety. The tests, which were conducted by a consortium of government agencies and commercial companies in the U.S. and Europe, mark the first time that lightning has been applied to an aircraft component in a wind tunnel in combination with severe weather conditions. Researchers hope that new non- electrically conducting materials will significantly improve flight safety in severe weather.

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Information about other activities and programs available from our Press Release Archive.

 

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