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New ARMD AA: All is Well Aeronautics Plan is Solid and Should Remain on Course
03.26.08
 
Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA's Aeronautics Research mission directorate, tells Dryden employees about the state of the directorate. Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA's Aeronautics Research mission directorate, tells Dryden employees about the state of the directorate. NASA Photo / Tom Tschida Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator of NASA's Aeronautics Research mission directorate, told Dryden employees March 12 at an all-hands meeting that a solid plan is in place for NASA aeronautics.

Shin reinforced the directorate's overarching mission:
  • advancing U.S. technological leadership in aeronautics in partnership with industry, academia and other government agencies that conduct aeronautics-related research.
  • supporting the agency's goal of developing a balanced program of science, exploration and aeronautics. The directorate's research plans also directly support the national aeronautics research and development policy and accompanying Executive Order 13419.
Shin said the work of the mission directorate is informed by three core principles that, "like good wine, over time have gotten better."

Those principles are:
  • dedicating ourselves to the mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies of aeronautics for the nation in all flight regimes.
  • focusing our research in areas appropriate to NASA's unique capabilities.
  • addressing the fundamental research needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System in partnership with the member agencies of the federal Joint Planning and Development Office.
Not only has the agency's aeronautics budget been stable, Shin noted, but he called the research "exciting," including as it does such projects as the Quiet Spike experiment (to use a telescopic nose boom to reduce the magnitude of sonic booms) that recently was honored with Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine's Laureate Award.

Another project Shin identified was the X-48B Blended Wing Body aircraft, which is being flown to validate an aerodynamic shape that one day could increase the range and fuel efficiency of a future cargo or large passenger jet.

"We can do exciting things by focusing on what we do best," he said. In addition, Shin called for more NASA research publications to show that NASA is the world's premier research and development agency. Through those publications, NASA could regain the edge in motivating students who might be future employees of NASA, he said.
 
 
Jay Levine
X-Press Editor
Dryden Flight Research Center