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NASA - Kevin Walsh Race Across America Daily Update
June 24, 2005
 

Friday, June 24, 8 a.m.

June 19, NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh set out from San Diego with 25 other cyclists for Atlantic City, New Jersey, on the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race. Walsh successfully rode 942 of the route's 3-thousand-52 miles in four days and six hours before respiratory difficulties and exhaustion forced him to withdraw June 23rd. Walsh's decision was unrelated to the death of another rider in a traffic accident earlier that day. Walsh and his support crew were proud of their effort he described as "100 percent," an effort that took Walsh from the Pacific Ocean to beyond the Continental Divide.

+ Related News Release 05-42

For more on Kevin's progress and the Race Across America, log on to http://www.raceacrossamerica.org.

Thursday, June 23, 2:30 p.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh withdrew from the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race Thursday due to respiratory difficulties and exhaustion after he reached checkpoint 17 at South Fork, Colo., at 4:07 p.m. EDT, 1:07 p.m. PDT. Kevin and his crew felt that he had given a 100 percent effort to reach that point past the Continental Divide, and in view of the circumstances, they agreed to withdraw for medical reasons. At the time he decided to drop out, Walsh had ridden for four days and six hours, covering some 942 miles of the 3,052-mile route.

Earlier in the day, tragedy struck the Race Across America when one of the riders, Bob Breedlove, was killed when he collided with a pickup truck about 28 miles west of Trinidad, Colo. Race officials indicated that the pickup's driver told investigating authorities that Breedlove appeared to collapse while riding and swerved head-on into the truck. Paramedics pronounced him dead at the scene. Race officials are giving the remaining competitors the option of whether to complete the race.

Thursday, June 23, 9:30 a.m. PDT

As the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race entered its fifth day, NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh is hanging tough as he proceeds through the eastern Rockies in Colorado. Walsh cleared checkpoint 15 at Durango, Colo., Wednesday evening and checkpoint 16 at Pagosa Springs, Colo., just before 6 a.m. EDT today, having covered some 900 miles of the 3,052-mile route. He is now on the last major climb in the Rockies, a 44-mile leg that goes over Wolf Creek Pass at almost 11,000 feet altitude over the Continental Divide. Then it's a long net downhill through the next several checkpoints. His crew reported that after struggling through the 100-degree-plus temperatures of the desert on the first three days, Walsh is feeling more energetic as he proceeds through the mountains at higher altitudes and cooler temperatures. His wife Kristy reports that his spirits are high and he sounded great when she reached him by phone Wednesday night. Walsh has averaged just under 10 mph for the entire route thus far, and must average at least 10 mph to make the next disqualification cutoff checkpoint at Mt. Vernon, Kan., 1,513 miles into the route, by 11 a.m. EDT Saturday to continue in the race. Walsh trails the other 21 solo riders still in the race, after three riders dropped out and one failed to make the last cutoff.

Thursday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. PDT

As the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race entered its fifth day, NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh is hanging tough as he proceeds through the eastern Rockies in Colorado. Walsh cleared checkpoint 15 at Durango, Colo., Wednesday evening and checkpoint 16 at Pagosa Springs, Colo., just before 6 a.m. EDT today, having covered some 900 miles of the 3,052-mile route. He is now on the last major climb in the Rockies, a 44-mile leg that goes over Wolf Creek Pass at almost 11,000 feet altitude over the Continental Divide. Then it's a long net downhill through the next several checkpoints. He must make the next disqualification cutoff checkpoint at Mt. Vernon, Kan., 1,513 miles into the route, by 11 a.m. EDT Saturday to continue in the race. Walsh trails the other 21 solo riders still in the race, after four riders dropped out or failed to make the last cutoff. His crew reported that after struggling through 100-degree-plus temperatures of the desert on the first three days, Walsh is feeling more energetic as he proceeds through the mountains at higher altitudes and cooler temperatures. He has averaged just under 10 mph for the entire route thus far.

Wednesday, June 22, 3:30 p.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh has pedaled more than 800 miles as he entered his fourth day of riding in the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race. Walsh passed through time checkpoint 14 at Cortez, Colo., at about 4:06 p.m. EDT/1:06 p.m. PDT Wednesday, and as of the time of this report, was about 20 miles west of time checkpoint 15 at Durango, Colo. After a very difficult third day, his crew reported that Walsh is feeling somewhat more energetic, thanks to the cooler temperatures at the 7,500-foot altitude. When he passes through Durango, Walsh will have covered 825 miles of the 3,051-mile route. He must make the next disqualification cutoff checkpoint at Mt. Vernon, Kan., by 8 a.m. Saturday to continue in the race. Walsh is trailing the other 21 riders still in the race, about 29 hours and 400 miles behind leader Jure' Robic. Four riders have dropped out or failed to make the last cutoff.

Wednesday, June 22, 8:30 a.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh is still holding his own as he completed his third day of riding in the Race Across America cross-country bicycle race. Walsh passed through time checkpoint 13 at Aneth, Utah, at about 4:55 a.m. EDT/1:55 a.m. PDT this morning, ahead of the disqualification cutoff at that point. After stopping for 3 hours of sleep, was back on the bike, heading to checkpoint 14 at Cortez, Colo., as this report was being written. His crew reported that he was very tired, but was fighting through the lack of rest as he climbed through the Rockies. When he passes through Cortez, Walsh will have covered 780 miles of the 3,051-mile route. His crew reports that he faces what will most likely be his toughest day today, as he has to climb more than 3,000 feet in about 160 miles. He must make the next disqualification cutoff checkpoint at Mt. Vernon, Kan., by 8 a.m. Saturday to continue in the race. Walsh is in 21st place, 25 hours behind leader Jure Robic. Three riders have dropped out or failed to make the cutoff at Aneth, leaving 23 riders, including one woman, still in the Race Across America.

Tuesday, June 21, 8 a.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh passed through time checkpoint 9 at Flagstaff, Ariz., shortly after 3:30 this morning as he entered the third day of the Race Across America bicycle race. Walsh moved up two positions during the night, and is now in 20th place among the 25 remaining solo riders in the 3,052-mile race from San Diego to Atlantic City, N.J. Walsh had covered just under 500 miles by Flagstaff, averaging a conservative 11 mph over the first two days. The leader, Jure' Robic of Slovenia, had passed checkpoint 15 at Durango, Colo., just after 8 a.m. today and had covered 825 miles at that point. The lone female entrant, Anna Catharina Berge of Visalia, Calif., was in 9th place overall, and had reached checkpoint 10 late Monday night, 563 miles into the race. One rider has dropped out of the race so far.

Monday, June 20, 3:30 p.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh passed through Congress, Ariz., shortly after 2 p.m. Monday, about 30 hours after he began cycling's greatest challenge, the Race Across America. The 26 individual competitors left San Diego, Calif., just after 7 a.m Sunday morning, to be followed a few days later by 25 relay teams. Walsh was in 22th place among solo riders as he passed through Congress, the sixth checkpoint along the 3,000-mile route, late Monday morning. He had covered slightly more than 340 miles at that point, averaging a conservative 13.3 mph for his first day's journey. He anticipates reaching the next checkpoint, Prescott, Ariz., by about 5 p.m and may reach Williams and Flagstaff, Ariz, later tonight. Individual cyclists have a maximum of 12 days to finish the route from San Diego to Atlantic City, N.J.; Walsh hopes to finish in about 10 days..

Monday, June 20, 9 a.m. PDT

NASA Dryden aerospace engineer Kevin Walsh passed through Hope, Ariz., shortly after 7 a.m. Monday morning, 24 hours after he began cycling's greatest challenge, the Race Across America. The 26 individual competitors left San Diego, Calif., just after 7 a.m Sunday morning, followed a few days later by 25 relay teams. Walsh was in 19th place among individuals as he passed through Hope, the fifth checkpoint along the almost 3,000-mile route. He had covered slightly more than 280 miles at that point, averaging a conservative 13.3 mph for his first day's journey. Other major checkpoints that he anticipates reaching today include Congress, Prescott, Williams and Flagstaff, Ariz. Individual cyclists have a maximum of 12 days to finish the route from San Diego to Atlantic City, N.J.; Walsh hopes to finish in about 10 days.
 

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