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General Electric Begins Work on Cloud Computing for Air Traffic Management
10.19.12
 
General Electric (GE) has begun work with NASA on Clouding Computing for Air Traffic Management. The overall goal of this collaboration is to explore air traffic management functional allocation schemes that leverage advanced networking concepts, and to determine whether such schemes will reduce the cost of the air traffic management operations. The approach is to leverage computing and networking advancements so that the technology, software, and application development, testing, upgrades, and modifications will be highly efficient at a system level. Advanced networking concepts include, but are not limited to, public and private cloud, cluster, and network computing. Deepak Kulkarni serves as a NASA technical monitor.

BACKGROUND: Cloud computing advances are intended to increase the efficiency of applications development and upgrades, and reduce duplication of development and data storage. These computing concepts allow the location of use and the location of processing or storage to be separated. Such separation allows for effective and consistent access to the same capability at multiple locations (or by multiple parties) in a synchronous or asynchronous manner. Further, modifications and upgrades of the capabilities (such as trajectory model of an aircraft) need to be done only once, enabling reduced downtime of aircraft, Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), or Airline Operations Center (AOC) capabilities for upgrades of software, models, database, and other functions that can be accessed by a network. Such separation also allows minimal processing, storage, and software to be resident at the location of use and enables a majority of functions to be located away from the location of use, but making them accessible on demand as needed. A reliable and secure networking capability is a key to the successful usage of these advanced computing concepts for safety-critical Air Traffic Management applications. As a result of these advanced networking concepts, different functional allocation schemes are possible within the decision triad of the AOC, the ANSP, and aircraft.

COLLABORATORS: Liling Ren (GE), Mark Ballin (NASA LaRC), Parimal Kopardekar (NASA ARC), Naz Galeon (NASA ARC)

NASA PROGRAM FUNDING: ARMD/Airspace Concepts and Technology Development Project

Contact: Deepak Kulkarni