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Jonas Dino
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
Phone: (650) 604-5612 / 9000
E-mail: jdino@mail.arc.nasa.gov

September 15, 2006
 
RELEASE : 06_68AR
 
 
NASA Shares Vision for Space Exploration with Portland Students
 
 
NASA Ames senior official Lewis Braxton and world-renowned planetary scientist Dr. Chris McKay will visit Vernon School, Portland, Ore., to share NASA's future exploration goals and their excitement about the future of space exploration. On Sept. 20, 2006, they will participate in a 'launch' event celebrating the selection of Vernon as a NASA Explorer School.

Braxton and McKay will participate in activities designed to excite students about the Vision for Space Exploration and their roles as the next generation of explorers. The event begins with the launching of student-built rockets followed by an assembly where Braxton and McKay will discuss how the students can participate by pursuing studies in math, science and technology and careers in aeronautics and space. Braxton and McKay will also speak at the school’s open house later that evening.

What: NASA Explorer School 'Launch' Event
When: 12:45 - 2:45 p.m. PDT, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2006
Who: Lewis Braxton, director of center operation at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and Dr. Chris McKay, planetary scientist.
Where: Vernon School, 2044 NE Killingsworth St, Portland, Ore.

What: Vernon School Open House
When: 7:00- 8:00 p.m. PDT, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2006
Who: Lewis Braxton, Director of Center Operation at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and Dr. Chris McKay, planetary scientist.
Where: Vernon School, 2044 NE Killingsworth St, Portland, Ore.

News media interested in attending either event or interviewing Braxton and McKay should contact Jonas Dino at 650/207-3280 or 650/604-5612. Visitors are required to sign in at each school's main office to enter the campus.

Braxton started his NASA career in 1975 as a co-op student at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. He holds a bachelor of science degree in accounting from California State University, Fresno; a degree in general management from the Harvard Graduate School of Business, and has been recognized by NASA for his management and service excellence. Braxton has served as the NASA Ames' chief financial officer and currently serves as the Ames director for center operations.

McKay is recognized as one of the world's leading planetary scientists studying Saturn's moon, Titan and the relationship between chemical and physical evolution and the origin of life in the solar system. He has been actively involved in planning for future Mars missions, including human settlements, and has been conducting research at the Mars-like environments in the Arctic and Antarctica. McKay holds a Ph.D. in astrogeophysics from the University of Colorado.

Vernon School was named one of NASA's 2006 Explorer Schools in May. The school started the program this fall.

The NASA Explorer School program is a three-year partnership, sponsored by NASA, to help educators and students join NASA's mission of discovery through educational activities and special learning opportunities tailored to promote science, mathematics and technology applications and career explorations.

During the partnership, students in the NES program participate in digital conferences with scientists and engineers at NASA. Educators also take the hands-on activities to their students to provide exciting learning experiences in the science, mathematics and technology fields.

For information about the NASA Explorer Schools Program, visit:

http://www.explorerschools.nasa.gov/portal/site/nes



For information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home



 

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