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April 20, 2000

Michael Mewhinney

NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

Phone: 650/604-3937, 650/604-9000

mmewhinney@mail.arc.nasa.gov


Bonnie Heald

U.S. House of Representatives

Subcommittee on Government Management, Information and Technology

Phone: 703/628-1182


RELEASE: 00-31AR

NOTE TO EDITORS AND NEWS DIRECTORS: News media are invited to cover a Congressional Hearing at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, on Monday, April 24, 2000, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. PDT. The hearing will be held in the Moffett Training and Conference Center, Bldg. 3. To get to Ames, take the Moffett Field exit off Highway 101. At the Moffett Federal Airfield main gate, proceed to the Visitor Badging Office to obtain entry badges and maps to the Moffett Training and Conference Center. Bring press credentials and photo ID to gain admittance.

NASA AMES TO HOST CONGRESSIONAL HEARING ON MONDAY, APRIL 24

"Emerging Technologies: Where is the Federal Government on the High-Tech Curve?" will be discussed during a public hearing before members of the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Government Management, Information and Technology on Monday, April 24, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA.

The hearing will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. PDT in the Main Ballroom of the Moffett Training and Conference Center, Bldg. 3, at Ames. The purpose of the hearing is to explore the emerging technologies being developed in the public -- and private -- sectors, and how these technologies could benefit government operations. The subcommittee will also examine the government’s role in encouraging this scientific development. The hearing will be open to the public.

Participating in the hearing will be Rep. Steve Horn, R-California, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Government Management, Information and Technology, Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-California, and Rep. Doug Ose, R-California.

Testimony will be provided by Samuel Venneri, Associate Administrator for NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology; Gilman Louie of In-Q-Tel, a nonprofit venture capital corporation chartered by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency; Glen Anderson, Executive Secretary, Battery Council International; Dr. Steven Popper, Associate Director of the Science and Technology Policy Institute, RAND; Dr. Sussane Huttner, Executive Director, Industry-University Cooperative Research Program, University of California; Dr. Richard Williams, School of Engineering, California State University at Long Beach; Ross MacPhee, SGI; Dr. Charles Shank, Director, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California; Mayor Pat Vorreiter, City of Sunnyvale; and Susan Hackwood, California Council on Science and Technology, University of California, Riverside.

The Federal Government sets public policies in key areas, such as education, research and development, electronic commerce, business regulation and law, and intellectual property rights that could have profound effects on the continuing development of emerging technologies. While innovation has always played a major role in the U.S. economy, its pace has increased dramatically.

The Congressional Research Service reported in 1999 that "one-half the store of human knowledge" has been produced during the past 50 years. These developments are in part the results of firms pursuing profits within an increasingly competitive environment. The Federal Government is now re-doubling its efforts to stay on the cutting-edge of emerging technologies.

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