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NASA Ames Hosts Broadcast of Solar Mission Launch Media Briefing
May 29, 2013
 

This image from JAXA's Hinode mission shows the lower regions of the sun's atmosphere, the interface region, which a new mission called the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, will study in exquisite detail. Click for larger image.
This image from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hinode mission shows the lower regions of the sun's atmosphere, the interface region, which a new mission called the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, will study in exquisite detail. Where previous missions have been able to image material at only a few predetermined temperatures in this region, IRIS will observe a wide range of temperatures from 5,000 kelvins to 65,000 kelvins (8,540 F to 116,540 F), and up to 10 million kelvins (about 18 million F) during solar flares. Its images will resolve structures down to 150 miles across. Image credit: JAXA/Hinode


MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. – In addition to viewing a live televised broadcast of a news briefing about the upcoming launch of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, reporters also are invited to interview IRIS team members who support the mission at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. IRIS is scheduled to launch June 26, 2013, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The news conference will be broadcast live from NASA Headquarters at 10 a.m. PDT, Tuesday, June 4, 2013, and shown in the Syvertson Auditorium, Bldg. N201, at NASA Ames. Reporters may ask questions from NASA Ames, by phone, or send questions to Twitter using the hashtag #askNASA. To participate by phone, reporters must contact Steve Cole at 202-358-0918 or stephen.e.cole@nasa.gov with their media affiliation by 7 a.m. PDT June 4. Reporters interested in attending the broadcast and asking questions of the team members at Ames must contact Rachel Hoover at rachel.hoover@nasa.gov by 9 a.m. PDT June 4.

Following the news conference, reporters will have an opportunity to interview Jim Strong, the flight director and mission operations manager, as well as Robert Carvalho, a flight controller and ground data system engineer for the IRIS mission. Once IRIS launches, a team at Ames will control the spacecraft on a daily basis. When acting as an IRIS ground data engineer, Carvalho helps design, develop and integrate the software tools that enable flight controller tasks.

IRIS is a NASA Small Explorer Mission to observe how solar material moves, gathers energy, and heats up as it travels through a little-understood region in the sun's lower atmosphere. This interface region between the sun's photosphere and corona powers its dynamic million-degree atmosphere and drives the solar wind. The region is the origin of most of the ultraviolet solar emission that impacts the near-Earth space environment and Earth's climate.

Briefing participants will include:
- Jeffrey Newmark, IRIS program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington
- Alan Title, IRIS principal investigator, Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, Calif.
- Gary Kushner, IRIS program manager, Lockheed Martin's Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, Calif.
- John Marmie, IRIS assistant project manager, NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.

For NASA TV streaming video, downlink and scheduling information, visit:



http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

For more information about the IRIS mission, visit:
 

http://www.nasa.gov/iris

For information about NASA Ames, visit:
 

http://www.nasa.gov/ames


 
 
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Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2013
Page Editor: NASA Administrator