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NASA Nanotechnology-Based Biosensor Helps Detect Biohazards
05.20.08
 
MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. -- NASA has developed a revolutionary nanotechnology-based biosensor that can detect trace amounts of specific bacteria, viruses and parasites. This biosensor will be used to help prevent the spread of potentially deadly biohazards in water, food and other contaminated sources.

NASA's Ames Research Center at Moffett Field in California licensed the biosensor technology to Early Warning Inc., Troy, N.Y. Under a Reimbursable Space Act Agreement, NASA and Early Warning jointly will develop biosensor enhancements. Initially, the biosensor will be configured to detect the presence of common and rare strains of microorganisms associated with water-borne illnesses and fatalities.

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. -- NASA has developed a revolutionary nanotechnology-based biosensor that can detect trace amounts of specific bacteria, viruses and parasites. This biosensor will be used to help prevent the spread of potentially deadly biohazards in water, food and other contaminated sources. Left: Meyya Meyyappan, chief scientist for exploration technology and former director off the Center for Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., (left) and Neil Gordon, president of Early Warning, Inc., Troy, N.Y., examine a prototype of NASA's nanotechnology-based biosensor licensed to Early Warning.

Photo Credit: NASA Ames Research Center / Dominic Hart
Click on the image for full-resolution.

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. -- NASA has developed a revolutionary nanotechnology-based biosensor that can detect trace amounts of specific bacteria, viruses and parasites. This biosensor will be used to help prevent the spread of potentially deadly biohazards in water, food and other contaminated sources. Left: Early Warning's Lab-on-a-Chip incorporates NASA's nanotechnology-based biosensor which can test for both common and rare strains of microorganisms associated with waterborne illnesses and infectious diseases.

Photo Credit: NASA Ames Research Center / Dominic Hart
Click on the image for full-resolution.