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STS-117 -- InfoOrb Text
06.04.07
 

 
The STS-117 mission patch includes the names of the crew and images of the shuttle and the station



The STS-117 space shuttle mission will continue construction of the International Space Station. The mission patch highlights the area of the station where the astronauts will install new components. The station is scheduled to be finished in 2010.
 
STS-117 crewmembers stand in front of an image of the station with the parts they will install highlighted



The crewmembers of STS-117 are (from the left) Clay Anderson, ISS Expedition 15 crewmember; Jim Reilly, Steven Swanson, mission specialists; Rick Sturckow, commander; Lee Archambault, pilot; Patrick Forrester, John "Danny" Olivas, mission specialists. They will fly aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis.
 
An astronaut sits in the space shuttle crew compartment trainer



STS-117 commander Rick Sturckow prepares for the mission by practicing in the space shuttle crew compartment trainer.


 
Illustration of the space station with the parts that are to be installed highlighted



The STS-117 crew will install two elements on the International Space Station. The first is the S3/S4 truss, or backbone, segment with a photovoltaic radiator. The second element is a set of solar arrays and batteries. The radiators, arrays and batteries are all part of the electrical power system.


 
A close-up view of a segment on the station's truss, or backbone, with an astronaut working to install it



The "S" in S3/S4 truss, or backbone, segment indicates that this section is on the starboard, or right side, of the space station when facing forward. The truss segments are attachment points for components such as solar arrays and thermal control radiators.
 
Unfurled station solar array with Earth in background



STS-117 will install another solar array on the International Space Station. Each array is covered with 32,800 solar cells that convert sunlight to electrical power. When the station is finished, the arrays will provide 110 kilowatts of power.
 
An astronaut sits on the floor, easing into bulky white pants of the training version of an Extravehicular Mobility Unit space suit



Mission specialist Steven Swanson suits up to train in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory, near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The NBL is a 202-by-102-foot pool where the astronauts train for spacewalks. Astronauts perform the same tasks underwater that they will outside the International Space Station.
 
The STS-117 crew poses with the U.S. training team



Professional trainers make sure the astronauts understand every task, system and piece of equipment. Trainers are some of the hundreds of people working together before and during a mission to ensure that everything goes as planned.
 
Divers assist an astronaut wearing a training version of an Extravehicular Mobility Unit space suit underwater



Before the STS-117 crewmembers install components in space, they practice in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Training in the large pool simulates the microgravity they experience in space. Divers assist the astronauts.
 
The 38 nickel-hydrogen battery cells are connected in series and packaged in an orbital replacement unit



When the space station is in the sunlight, its solar panels provide power. When the station is in Earth's shadow, nickel-hydrogen batteries provide the power. The STS-117 crew will install two sets of 38 rechargeable battery cells.
 
A close-up view of a station radiator with solar panels in the background



The photovoltaic radiators keep the space station's power systems cool. The seven-panel radiator removes the extra heat by circulating fluid and releasing the heat into space. The STS-117 crew will install a radiator.
 


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