Feature

STS-120 -- Mission Patch Explorer Game
10.22.07
 
A drawing of the STS-120 mission patch with the names of the crew encircling a drawing of the space shuttle, a starburst, the moon and Mars






Read below to learn more about the STS-120 mission patch.
 
A golden silhouette of the space shuttle orbiter with the Harmony module on the STS-120 mission patch





Space Shuttle

Space shuttle Discovery will take the STS-120 crew to the International Space Station. The payload bay of the orbiter carries the Harmony module. Harmony will be the connecting point for European and Japanese laboratories. Harmony was named by U.S. students in the Name the International Space Station Node 2 Challenge.
 
White starburst with two red points and two gold points




Starburst

The starburst represents the International Space Station. The red points show the current location of the P6 solar array. The P in P6 means that this solar array is on the port, or left side, of the space station. The 6 in P6 means that this array is in the sixth section of the station trusses. The STS-120 crew will move the P6 solar array to its new and permanent position -- the spot of the gold points on the burst.
 
Drawings of the moon and Mars





Moon and Mars

The moon and Mars represent the future of NASA. By going to the moon for long periods of time, astronauts will search for resources and learn how to work safely in a harsh environment. Robotic explorers have found evidence of a watery past on Mars. Human explorers on the Red Planet will learn more.
 
Drawing of the three stars of Orion's belt in the Orion constellation






Orion Constellation

The constellation Orion represents the new space vehicle of the same name. The Orion crew vehicle will one day replace the shuttle in transporting humans to space.
 
A close-up view of the name Melroy on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Pam Melroy





Melroy

Commander Pam Melroy calls STS-120 "a cool mission." When her crew brings the Harmony module to the International Space Station, it will allow more laboratories to be connected to the space station and more people to live there. Melroy piloted the space shuttle Discovery in 2000 and Atlantis in 2002. This mission is her first as commander.
 
A close-up view of the name Zamka on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of George Zamka





Zamka

George Zamka is the pilot for the STS-120 space shuttle mission. He became an astronaut in 1998. Besides piloting the shuttle, Zamka is responsible for the space shuttle orbiter systems. He is also Commander Melroy's assistant in docking and undocking the orbiter with the space station. This flight on space shuttle Discovery is his first mission into space.
 
A close-up view of the name Wilson on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Stephanie Wilson






Wilson

Stephanie Wilson is a mission specialist on STS-120. She also flew on Discovery in 2006. On the STS-120 mission, she will assist with the installation of the Harmony module and the moving of the solar array by operating the space shuttle and space station robotic arms.
 
A close-up view of the name Nespoli on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Paolo Nespoli





Nespoli

Paolo Nespoli is a mission specialist from the European Space Agency, or ESA. Born in Milan, Italy, Nespoli became an astronaut with the Italian space agency. He was selected to the ESA Astronaut Corps in 1998. The Harmony module that will be installed during STS-120 was built in Italy.
 
A close-up view of the name Tani on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Daniel Tani





Tani

Daniel Tani is a mission specialist on STS-120. He flew as a mission specialist on STS-108 in 2001. Tani will remain on board the International Space Station when space shuttle Discovery returns back to Earth. He will be a flight engineer on the space station. He is scheduled to return on mission STS-122.
 
A close-up view of the name Wheelock on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Doug Wheelock






Wheelock

Doug Wheelock is a mission specialist. On his first flight aboard the space shuttle, Wheelock will perform spacewalks and robotics operations. Before this mission, he worked in the astronaut offices in the U.S. and in Russia.
 
A close-up view of the name Parazynski on the STS-120 mission patch and a photo of Scott Parazynski





Parazynski

Scott Parazynski is a medical doctor and a mission specialist. STS-120 is his fifth space shuttle mission. Before STS-120, he already logged over 1,019 hours in space, including 20 hours of spacewalking time. Parazynski’s tasks on this mission include performing four spacewalks that will help to install the Harmony node.
 
>  View interactive version