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Audio Clips: Dec. 21 Stardust briefing
12.21.05
 
Audio clips from the Dec. 21 briefing at NASA Headquarters on the impending return of the Stardust mission.

After nearly seven years and about three billions miles traveled, the spacecraft is just about ready to come home. On January 15, 2006, the spacecraft will release a capsule that will parachute to Earth, carrying precious samples of cometary and interstellar dust.

More information at http://www.nasa.gov/stardust . Related Stardust podcast at http://www.nasa.gov/podcast .

CUT 1 – Andy Dantzler
Dir. Solar Systems Division, NASA HQ
Running time: :08
OUT: "FROM A COMET"
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Transcript of CUT 1:
"On January 15, the Stardust mission will bring back to earth the very first sample collected from a comet."

CUT 2 – Andy Dantzler
Dir. Solar Systems Division, NASA HQ
Running time: :18
OUT: "VERY PROUD OF"
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Transcript of CUT 2:
"Stardust has traveled almost 7 years and 2.9 billion miles around the solar system to come back to earth to bring back this cometary sample. That's a dintance record for an earth returning spacecraft and it's a first that we can all be very proud of."

CUT 3 – Dr. Don Brownlee, Stardust principal investigator
Running time: :12
OUT: "CALL THEM STARDUST"
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Transcript of CUT 3:
"Our mission is called Stardust in part because we believe some of the particles in the comet will in fact, be older than the sun and planets that formed around other stars ... we call them stardust."

CUT 4 – Dr. Don Brownlee, Stardust principal investigator
Running time: :09
OUT: "LIKE A DECADE"
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Transcript of CUT 4:
"Our goal -- our sample collection goal in terms of numbers of samples is to collect more samples than we can analyze in like a decade."

CUT 5 – Dr. Don Brownlee, Stardust principal investigator
Running time: :12
OUT: "REAL THRILLING TIME"
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Transcript of CUT 5:
"This is a fantastic opportunity to collect the most primitive materials in the solar system. We’ve collected them and they’re only weeks away from landing on earth. It’s a real thrilling time!"