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NKC Expedition 28 Text

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The Expedition 28 Crew

The Crew

The Expedition 28 crew has completed its mission.

On April 5, 2011, Ron Garan, Alexander Samokutyaev and Andrey Borisenko rode to the space station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. They joined the Expedition 27 crew there. They stayed aboard to make up the first half of the Expedition 28 crew.

Cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko was an Expedition 27 flight engineer. He was the commander of Expedition 28. He dreamed of going into space when he was a little boy. He worked hard to make that dream come true.

Astronaut Ron Garan was a flight engineer for Expedition 27. He was a flight engineer on Expedition 28, too. He decided to become an astronaut when he saw on television the first astronaut walk on the moon.

Cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev is in the Russian air force. Expedition 28 was his first visit to space. When he was in kindergarten, his teacher gave him a toy rocket. From that time on, he knew he wanted to go into space.

On June 7, 2011, Sergei Volkov, Mike Fossum and Satoshi Furukawa rode to the station in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. They joined the Expedition 28 crew on June 9, 2011.

Astronaut Mike Fossum was an Expedition 28 flight engineer. He stayed on and became the Expedition 29 commander. Fossum was born just as the space program started. He grew up dreaming about being an astronaut.

Sergi Volkov was a flight engineer for Expedition 28. Volkov grew up in Star City, Russia. Star City is home to the Russian space program. His father was a cosmonaut, too!

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa was an Expedition 28 flight engineer. He trained 12 years to be an astronaut. Expedition 28 was his first visit to the International Space Station.
 

The Expedition 28 Mission Patch

The Expedition 28 crew designed a mission patch before flying into space. The space station flies at the front of Earth. The crew flew about 50 years after the first Russian and American flew into space. Their two names are on the bottom of the patch with the words "50 Years" between them.

Click here to learn more about other missions.

Page Last Updated: January 21st, 2014
Page Editor: NASA Administrator