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Robotics

Teaching From Space

A high school student interviews the crew of the International Space Station Learn more about how you and your students can get involved in real space missions.
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NASA Office of Education

Astronaut Barbara Morgan observes a student working on a computer Visit the NASA Education website. You'll discover a wealth of information including a list of current opportunities; education related feature stories; and contact information for project representatives.
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Robotics in Motion

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Mars Curiosity Rover

Artist's drawing of the Curiosity rover on MarsThe Curiosity rover will spend two years looking for signs of life on the Red Planet. Image Credit: NASA Curiosity is not your ordinary rover. It's bigger than a small car. The rover comes equipped "standard" with six-wheel rocker-bogie suspension and multiple camera systems, and its power supply doesn't rely on solar panels. Curiosity uses a radioisotope power generator so that it can roam longer and farther, traveling to more interesting places than previous missions. It has an expansive suite of science instruments named Sample Analysis at Mars, designed to analyze samples of material collected and delivered by the rover's arm.

› Mars Exploration Program →
› NASA Mars Missions
› Sample Analysis at MARS (SAM) →
› William Shatner and the Grand Entrance Video
› Educational Resources →

Robotic Exploration Rover

Screenshot from rover gameTest your programming skills and move the robot around the obstacles. Image Credit: NASA NASA tests robots for exploration in areas called analogs. Analogs are places where the environment is similar to locations like Mars or the moon, where a robot may be used. One NASA analog is in the Arizona desert. NASA robotics experts conduct field tests in the desert to assess new ideas for rovers, spacewalks and ground support. Some of these tests are conducted by a team called Desert RATS, which stands for Desert Research And Technology Studies.

What is it like to be part of a team that designs and tests robots? Find out and test your programming skills with "ROVER". Guide the robot over an analog of 12 terrain grids without consuming all of his battery power. Watch out for obstacles!

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Video Gallery


International Space Station
Robotics on the International
Space Station
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Lunar Electric Rover
Desert RATS Testing
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A lunabotics robot
Lunabotics 2012
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A student working with a robot
Robotics Competitions
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Page Last Updated: March 26th, 2014
Page Editor: NASA Administrator