Hubble Careers

Featured Career

    Ben Reed - Materials Assurance Engineer

Hubble Business and Financial Careers

    Sherri – Business Manager

    Head shot photo of Sherri What critical choices did you make growing up that helped you get where you are today?
    I chose to enroll in my high school’s Cooperative Office education program that started my career at Goddard.

    What do you do in your job?
    Working with engineers, scientists and program management, I oversee the development and execution of the multi-million dollar Hubble budget. I am responsible for the integrity of the data and ensuring the finances are sufficient to accomplish the mission’s goals. I also monitor the program workforce so that we maintain levels of employment sufficient to accomplish and sustain a successful mission.

    What do you do in your free time?
    Scuba diving, reading, home improvements and gardening.

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    Gibran – Financial Analyst

    Head shot photo of Gibran What do you like about your job?
    At NASA, there are a lot of inquisitive minds. A large part of the workforce is composed of scientists, so the place where I work is a center of learning. People come to share and build their knowledge about a great variety of things. I have the opportunity to learn to how to manage large-dollar contracts, as well as what it takes to operate and upgrade an incredibly complex spaced-based telescope.

    What do you do in your free time?
    I run a small herbal tea company which takes up most of my “free” time now. I also do yoga, read a lot, and listen to hip-hop, jazz, and good music a little bit of everywhere.

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    Vince – Financial Manager

    Head shot photo of Vince Your quote/advice to kids?
    No one is in charge of your happiness except you.

    What do you wish you’d known then that you know now about education after high school?
    I wish I knew that most employers won’t interview you without at least a bachelor’s degree. If known, I would have gone to school full time and obtained my degree before entering the workforce. Before I got my degree, I was forced to prove that I could do the job before I was considered for an interview.

    What school subjects do you use at work?
    All mathematics, writing (both technical and constructive), and the most important subject I was forced to take in high school – typing!

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Hubble Engineering Careers

    Karin – Engineer/Diver

    Head shot photo of Karin What do you do in your job?
    Believe it or not, I scuba dive with astronauts for my job! I work with the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission team. That means I get to help write the procedures and train the astronauts for their spacewalks to repair and improve Hubble. Although I spend a lot of time at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston, Texas, my home base is in Greenbelt, Maryland at Goddard Space Flight Center. That is where the new instruments and replacement units are assembled and tested before they are shipped to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch. IT is very exciting to be working one-on-one with the experts that designed this world-class telescope and see the great pictures of our universe through its optics.

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    Jackie - HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager

    Head shot photo of Jackie What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for ensuring that WFC3 meets its technical requirements, is assembled on time, and within cost. I direct several engineers, technicians and scientists working at about 10 major organizations around the country to ensure they deliver the best possible instrument to Hubble.

    What do you wish you’d known then?
    It’s okay not to know the answer right away. It’s okay to ask teachers for help. It’s okay to risk failure. Never give up on your dream – persistence pays off.

    What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    I call it “The lure of the Meatball” – in reference to the NASA logo. In engineering, there are certainly higher salaries and perks available outside the Government, but for me, a particular pride, professional independence, and technical excellence come along with working directly for NASA. I have an inherent ability to speak my mind and work in line with my technical conscience because I work for NASA, and I wouldn’t trade that for any amount of money.

    Education
    B.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    Teri - HST Flight Servicing Project Thermal Systems Lead

    Head shot photo of Teri Gregory What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Flight Servicing Project Thermal Systems lead at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for the thermal design, implementation, testing and installation of hardware for SM4.

    What are the main areas for which you are responsible for Servicing Mission 4?
    Our three main areas of responsibility involve the new flight Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) for Hubble that will enhance performance and extend the life of the telescope, flight support equipment and carriers that will safely stow hardware during the mission, and Crew Aids and Tools the astronauts will use to change out the ORUs. My team also ensures all flight hardware is maintained within its operating temperature limits during all phases of the mission.

    Education
    BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    Lisa M. - Integration and Test Engineer

    Head shot photo of Lisa M. What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    NASA has much to offer such as ample annual leave, a robust retirement plan, flexible work hours, free graduate education, access to a gym, and many clubs, including organized sports.

    What school subjects do you use at work?
    I've used most of my math, physics, and engineering classes to some degree.

    What critical choices or decisions did you make?
    In an all-girls high school, I had a choice of going with the popular (at the time) secretarial route or the science route. I chose science, which was the precursor to everything else I did academically and in my career.

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    Ben - HST Lead Materials Assurance Engineer

    Head shot photo of Ben Reed What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Lead Materials Assurance Engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I determine the best material to use to build something, whether it is a new metal super alloy, a high strength plastic or highly reflective glass mirror. If components fail during ground testing it’s my job to determine why, and I also attempt to determine why materials degrade in space.

    What specific things have you worked on?
    I helped build the new cameras for Hubble, and helped develop the glue which will hold a radiator to Hubble at minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Education
    Attended the University of North Carolina Wilmington, Wilmington, N.C., for one year then completed a B.S. in Chemistry from the Catholic University of America, Washington, DC.

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    Art - Lead Mission Systems Engineer for Hubble Space Telescope

    Head shot photo of Art Whipple What do you do in your job?
    I am the Lead Mission Systems Engineer for Hubble Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. I am responsible for leading the HST systems engineering team through the development cycle – from defining initial requirements, through design, assembly, test, integration, launch and orbital operations.

    What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    During SM4 I will serve as the HST Servicing Mission Manager on the planning shift. On this shift I begin my day between the time the astronauts complete an ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) or spacewalk, and when they sleep. I work with the entire HST and Shuttle operations teams to check-out the equipment they installed on the telescope during the previous EVA and prepare any required changes to procedures and notes for the next EVA.

    Education
    B.A. in Mathematics from University of Rochester, a M.A. in Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from The University of Texas, Austin.

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    Chuck - Materials Engineer

    Head shot photo of Chuck What or who inspired you to really go after your profession?
    My curiosity for understanding the universe and my desire to do what I can to understand our impact on the planet.

    What do you do in your job?
    As a test engineer, I performed testing and evaluations on several components that were installed on Hubble during the last servicing mission and several more that will be installed on Hubble later this year.

    Why do you do your job?
    I believe in Goddard Space Flight Center's commitment to Earth and space science. I have always had a strong commitment to understanding and reducing our impact on the planet. Since everything is made of materials, the Materials Engineering Branch where I work, is the perfect place to support GSFC and my own personal goals.

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    Peter – Mechanical Test Engineer

    Head shot photo of Peter What obstacles did you face growing up and how did you overcome them?
    I developed kidney disease in high school and had to undergo regular blood tests and then dialysis treatments early in my career. The condition got me more active – running, soccer, cross-country skiing. With faith, and not a little soul searching about what I wanted from my career and life, I got through it.

    What do you do in your job?
    I serve as a go-between for the testing customer who “owns” the instrument or spacecraft, and the testing crew. This is exciting because I get to be involved in numerous phases of testing, and learn a bit about how flight hardware is designed, built and tested.

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    Shirley – Senior Principal Engineer

    Head shot photo of Shirley What obstacles did you face growing up?
    Losing my father at a young age meant less money would be available for college. Just finding a way to attend college was a very big obstacle for me to overcome.

    What do you do in your job?
    My job is to develop and test flight software used to command the Hubble Space Telescope. As a team, we write requirements and then create a design from the requirements. Software is developed in the C and C++ languages and then tested prior to being uploaded to the telescope.

    What are the best and worst parts of your job?
    Flexible work schedule is the best and the worst is that deadlines are sometimes unrealistic.

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    Lynette - Product Assurance Engineer

    Head shot photo of Lynette What critical choices or decisions did you make growing up that helped you get to where you are today?
    I grew up in the US Virgin Islands and just choosing to go to college was my most critical decision. Back then, most kids were taking vocational education to get out into the Island workforce. I lot of people I knew were also enlisting in the military as a way off the island. I don't think I really had a choice - it was either college or the military - I took both.

    Your quote/advice to kids?
    Don't look at what you don't have, make what you do have work for you.

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    Lynn – Satellite Systems Engineer and Manager

    Head shot photo of Lynn Your quote/advice to kids?
    Diversity, broaden your skills, think about the big picture, work hard, and accept yourself.

    What do you wish you’d known about education after high school?
    My dad was correct when he said that college isn’t about getting high grades….it is really about training your mind so that you can readily go out into a profession with the tools and skills to succeed and/or the drive to continue learning on the job the tools and skills necessary to succeed.

    What do you do in your job?
    I manage the Hubble Flight Operations Team and the procedures they use to command Hubble and monitor it on a 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year basis.

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    Joyce - Systems Engineer

    Head shot photo of Joyce Your quote/advice to kids?
    A problem is only an opportunity waiting to be solved.

    What do you do in your job?
    I am a systems engineer, which means I get to be involved with everything! Since systems covers all areas, I get to learn all about the systems to operate Hubble. This includes everything from the development and installation of new flight software to implementing changes to the ground system used to command Hubble.

    Why do you do your job?
    I am lucky to be one of the many who ensure the Hubble Space Telescop continues to operate and conduct fantastic science. I love being associated with the exciting science exploration Hubble does.

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    Kevin - Systems Engineer for Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys repair effort

    Head shot photo of Kevin Boyce What do you do in your job?
    I am the Systems Engineer for Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys repair effort. My team designed and built an electronics box, designed to keep it cool so it won’t overheat once installed on Hubble, tested the box to ensure it will withstand the rigors of launch, wrote software to run it, and updated the ground system software to control it. We also designed a way to cut into the existing instrument’s hardware in order to remove some of its electronics, and insert our new electronics. I collaborated with all the Hubble engineers and designers for this effort.

    Education
    B.S. in Science from Princeton University, NJ, and a Ph.D from MIT, Massachusetts.

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Hubble Engineering and Science Management Careers

    Mike - HST Carrier Development Manager

    Head shot photo of Mike Adams What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Carrier Development Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for the Shuttle’s payload bay hardware which will safely deliver the new instruments, electronics, and tools to orbit during SM4. We ensure these items remain secure during launch and landing, and keep them at the proper temperature while on orbit. I am responsible for four carriers for SM4 – the Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC), the Orbital Replaceable Unit Carrier (ORUC), the Flight Support System (FSS), and the Multi-Use Lightweight Equipment (MULE ) Carrier.

    What is the purpose of the shuttle payload bay hardware?
    These structures carry the instruments, avionics, and tools needed during the servicing mission. I also manage the design, fabrication, and test of new hardware that is integrated into the carriers prior to the servicing mission.

    Education
    B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a M.S in Mechanical Engineering from George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

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    Jackie – Engineer/Instrument Manager

    Head shot photo of Jackie What do you wish you’d known then?
    It’s okay not to know the answer right away. It’s okay to ask teachers for help. It’s okay to risk failure. Never give up on your dream – persistence pays off.

    What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    I call it “The lure of the Meatball” – in reference to the NASA logo. In engineering, there are certainly higher salaries and perks available outside the Government, but for me, a particular pride, professional independence, and technical excellence come along with working directly for NASA. I have an inherent ability to speak my mind and work in line with my technical conscience because I work for NASA, and I wouldn’t trade that for any amount of money.

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    Mark - HST Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Office Manager

    Head shot photo of Mark Jarosz What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Office Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I manage a team that develops EVA procedures, techniques, and tools the astronauts will use to service and repair Hubble. My team trains the astronauts at Goddard and Johnson Space Center using a combination of engineering units, mockups (exact models) and flight hardware. I coordinate and manage all the HST hardware the astronauts practice with at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab water tank as well as provide a team of Scuba divers to support the astronaut EVA crew during underwater training.

    What was your role in prior Hubble servicing missions?
    I served as the Carrier Manager for SM3A and SM3B, responsible for developing and delivering the carrier flight hardware used to transport the Hubble repair instruments, equipment, and tools to orbit aboard the Space Shuttle.

    Education
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering form the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

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    Vince – Financial Manager

    Head shot photo of Vince Your quote/advice to kids?
    No one is in charge of your happiness except you.

    What do you wish you’d known then that you know now about education after high school?
    I wish I knew that most employers won’t interview you without at least a bachelor’s degree. If known, I would have gone to school full time and obtained my degree before entering the workforce. Before I got my degree, I was forced to prove that I could do the job before I was considered for an interview.

    What school subjects do you use at work?
    All mathematics, writing (both technical and constructive), and the most important subject I was forced to take in high school – typing!

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    Hsiao - HST Instrument Development Office Manager

    Head shot photo of Hsiao Smith What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Instrument Development Office Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for providing the new science instruments for SM4 – the Wide Field Camera 3 and Cosmic Origins Spectrograph – along with hardware that will repair the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and Advanced Camera for Surveys on Hubble. I manage the design, fabrication, and test of the two new science instruments and replacement hardware – a collaborative effort involving numerous companies around the country as well as personnel at Goddard.

    Education
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Masters in Engineering Management from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    Tom - HST Observatory Manager

    Head shot photo of Tom Griffin. What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Observatory Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team designed, developed, fabricated, assembled, tested and is delivering the spacecraft systems and components that astronauts will install on Hubble during SM4, including a refurbished Fine Guidance Sensor, gyroscopes, Electrical Control Units, batteries, New Thermal Blanket Layer (NOBL), Soft Capture and Rendezvous System, Fuse Plugs/Modules, and Latch Over-center kits. We also ensure that all spacecraft systems, science instruments, Space Support Equipment and Crew Aids and Tools are brought together, integrated, tested and verified prior to launch.

    Education
    B.S. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a M.S. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Michigan.

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    Chip – Property Manager

    Head shot photo of Chip What do you do in your job?
    As a property and logistics manager, I ensure that all equipment we use is documented and tracked. I also coordinate the transportation and storage of items such as flight hardware (items and instruments to be flown on orbit or on the Space Shuttle), excess hardware, and computers. If it isn’t nailed down, I’m responsible for it.

    What are the best and worst parts of your job?
    The best part is that I know that what I do makes a difference and I’ll be able to say later on in life that I was part of the Hubble team and NASA. The worst part is commuting 40 miles to work one way.

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    Lynn – Satellite Systems Engineer and Manager

    Head shot photo of Lynn Your quote/advice to kids?
    Diversity, broaden your skills, think about the big picture, work hard, and accept yourself.

    What do you wish you’d known about education after high school?
    My dad was correct when he said that college isn’t about getting high grades….it is really about training your mind so that you can readily go out into a profession with the tools and skills to succeed and/or the drive to continue learning on the job the tools and skills necessary to succeed.

    What do you do in your job?
    I manage the Hubble Flight Operations Team and the procedures they use to command Hubble and monitor it on a 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year basis.

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    Joyce - Senior Systems Manager for HST

    Head shot photo of Joyce King What do you do in your job?
    I am a Senior Systems Manager for HST at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I provide system engineering leadership for all aspects of the Hubble Operations project, including HST operations, life extension and servicing mission activities.

    What is your role for Servicing Mission 4?
    During SM4, I will serve as the Mission Operations Manager (MOM) on the planning shift, responsible for all operations in the STOCC. I coordinate with the Servicing Mission Manager and Systems Manager for all nominal mission operations, contingency operations, and Command Plan/Servicing Mission Integrated Timeline re-plan activities. The MOM is the key interface to the Senior Systems Manager at JSC to provide operational status and coordinate all mission critical activities.

    Education
    B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Haven and a M.S. in Engineering Management from the University of Central Florida.
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    Keith - Servicing Mission Operations Manager

    Head shot photo of Keith Walyus What do you do in your job?
    I am the Servicing Mission Operations Manager in the Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I am responsible for ensuring my team of about 90 engineers is ready to execute the HST servicing mission. I ensure proper procedures are built to command the telescope, the team is properly trained, and the control center is functioning properly.

    What is your role for Servicing Mission 4?
    During the mission, I will work on console as the Mission Operations Manager (MOM). Each shift will be 12 hours and I will be assigned to the orbit shift, which includes the rendezvous, spacewalks, and deploy of Hubble. The other shift, a 12-hour planning shift, during which any re-planning occurs to make sure our timelines are ready for the next day’s EVAs, or spacewalks, is staffed by Joyce King.

    Education
    B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Houston.

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    Jackie - HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager

    Head shot photo of Jackie What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for ensuring that WFC3 meets its technical requirements, is assembled on time, and within cost. I direct several engineers, technicians and scientists working at about 10 major organizations around the country to ensure they deliver the best possible instrument to Hubble.

    What do you wish you’d known then?
    It’s okay not to know the answer right away. It’s okay to ask teachers for help. It’s okay to risk failure. Never give up on your dream – persistence pays off.

    What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    I call it “The lure of the Meatball” – in reference to the NASA logo. In engineering, there are certainly higher salaries and perks available outside the Government, but for me, a particular pride, professional independence, and technical excellence come along with working directly for NASA. I have an inherent ability to speak my mind and work in line with my technical conscience because I work for NASA, and I wouldn’t trade that for any amount of money.

    Education
    B.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Hubble Outreach Careers

    Tara – Educator

    Head shot photo of Tara What do you do in your job?
    I work with education and public outreach colleagues in the Heliophysics, Astrophysics, and Planetary divisions to develop new educational products, conduct teacher workshops and community events.

    I recently hosted a live, videoconferencing event focusing on the careers and educational backgrounds of the Hubble servicing mission astronaut crew. In October, the “Discovery” network is holding their annual Discovery Young Scientist Challenge at Goddard. My task is to ensure everything runs smoothly for this event so I am coordinating all the local details of this event.

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    Susan – Public Affairs Officer

    Head shot photo of Susan Your quote/advice to kids?
    Find positive role models, even if it means looking outside your circle of friends.

    What did you learn about education after high school?
    That college is not as difficult as some lead you to believe.

    What do you do in your job?
    I am involved with a diverse group of print and broadcast media. Working behind the camera, I assist documentary and news media with their produced stories. I set up on-site film shoots, escort media crews, review press releases, develop talking points, and help keep everyone on schedule.

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    Devon – Summer Intern

    Head shot photo of Devon What do you do in your job?
    I am a Web designer and production assistant. Most of the time I develop Web content, but since I work for a TV producer, sometimes I help with the shots or whatever else is going on with NASA TV at Goddard.

    What are the best and worst parts of your job?
    There are a lot of things I like about my job. I get to be around some brilliant minds, my work is something professional, and I met four astronauts. Not much tops that. The hardest things about my job are the rules and regulations I have to learn and follow. Because of NASA policy, there are some things I can’t do as an artist.

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    Mike - Television and Media Producer

    Head shot photo of Mike What did you want to be when you grew up?
    A Rock Star, Movie Producer, Pilot, or Architect

    What do you wish you had known then that you know now about education after high school?
    College is not solely a didactic learning experience. It's not all lectures, research, and long hours of study. It offers a new network of friends, exposure to new and different ideas, and most importantly, a place to grow into the person you will become.

    What do you do in your job?
    I'm responsible for the entire production from developing the concept and directing the crew to final delivery of the finished product.

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    Lori - Senior Web Developer

    Head shot photo of Lori What obstacles did you face and how did you overcome them?
    My biggest obstacle was the money (I am still paying student loans!). I wish I had known about a book that lists all available scholarships and how to get them. There would have been less stress if I hadn't had to worry about my finances every semester.

    What do you do in your job?
    I work a lot at my computer, designing, programming, and putting information and pictures on the Web sites for which I am responsible.

    What do you do in your free time?
    I, and several others, work on a race car for a friend. As part of his pit crew, we go to the track when he races and fix anything that needs to be fixed. I also like to read and grow orchids.

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Hubble Program Management Careers

    Preston - Associate Director of Flight Projects/Program Manager for the HST Program

    Head shot photo of Preston Burch What do you do in your job?
    I am the Associate Director of Flight Projects/Program Manager for HST at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I am responsible for the overall operations and on-orbit servicing of Hubble, its science program, and the development of science instruments and spacecraft components. Prior to serving in this position, I was the Deputy Associate Director of Space Science Operations and Project Manager for the HST Operations Project, with responsibility for mission operations, science operations, servicing operations, ground system development and maintenance, and flight software development and maintenance for the HST observatory. I also served as the Deputy Project Manager for the HST Operations Project.

    Education
    B.S. in Physics from Adelphi University, Garden City, NY.

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    Frank - Deputy Associate Director for the HST Development Project

    Head shot photo of Frank Cepollina What do you do in your job?
    I am the Deputy Associate Director for the HST Development Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I lead a team of engineers and technicians who are responsible for developing new science instruments and replacement hardware and on-orbit servicing that has kept Hubble on the cutting edge of technology for more than 18 years.

    Education
    B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Santa Clara.

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    Mansoor - Deputy Associate Director of Space Science Operations at Goddard Space Flight Center

    Head shot photo of Mansoor Ahmed What do you do in your job?
    I am the Deputy Associate Director of Space Science Operations at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I serve as the project manager for the Hubble Operations project, leading a large team of engineers and scientists who ensure that Hubble produces the highest quality astronomical research without jeopardizing the health and safety of this national asset.

    Education
    B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a Master’s in Mechanical Engineering from George Washington University, Washington D.C.

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    Mike - Deputy Associate Director/Technical for the Hubble Space Telescope

    Head shot photo of Mike Weiss What do you do in your job?
    I am the Deputy Associate Director/Technical for the Hubble Space Telescope at Goddard Space Flight Center. In this capacity, I lead the technical development of all program activities, including servicing, operations, and advanced studies. I also directed the systems development for the first two Hubble servicing missions.

    Education
    BS and MS in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    Keith - Deputy Manager of the HST Operations Project at Goddard Space Flight Center

    Head shot photo of Keith Kalinowski What do you do in your job?
    I am the Deputy Manager of the HST Operations Project at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. In this capacity, I manage the technical activities of the Project team, formulate and defend the Project’s budget, keep activities on schedule, and ensure that HST Operations is primed and fully ready for Servicing Mission 4 and the post-mission orbital verification period that follows the mission. I have served in a variety of Hubble positions over the years.

    What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    For SM 4, I will serve as a member of the HST Project team at the Johnson Space Center and will be the primary interface to HST operations at Goddard during the 12-hour shifts that include the mission’s five planned spacewalks, or EVAs.

    Education
    B.A. in Physics from Kenyon College, Gambier, OH, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Astrophysics and Astronomy, respectively from Indiana University.

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    Edward - Deputy Program Manager for the HST Program

    Head shot photo of Ed Ruitberg What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    I am the Deputy Program Manager for the HST Program at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I am responsible for overall management of SM4 development, HST mission operations, and science operations. During SM4, I will be in charge of the HST Project Management Team at Goddard during the Extravehicular Activity (orbit) shift.

    What other jobs have you had?
    I have worked at Goddard for more than 40 years; with more than 25 years on the HST Project in positions that span the areas of operational ground systems development, flight software development, science operations management, HST servicing mission operations, and program/project management.

    Education
    B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY.

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    Mike - Deputy Project Manager for the Hubble Space Telescope Development Project

    Head shot photo of Mike Kienlen What do you do in your job?
    I am the Deputy Project Manager for the Hubble Space Telescope Development Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. I assist the project manager in managing the development of flight hardware for the Hubble servicing missions. I helped lead the successful execution of three Hubble missions, and I am currently preparing for SM4.

    What did you do before your current position?
    Before my current position, I served as the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Mission Manager on STS-95, “the John Glenn mission.” This flight included experimental equipment that was later installed on Hubble to reactivate a dormant scientific camera. While serving in this position, I was also the Hubble Space Telescope Space Support Equipment Manager, managing the preparation of the carriers that deliver Hubble equipment to orbit.

    Education
    Two BS degrees, one in Aerospace Engineering from Pennsylvania State University and another in Physics from Shippensburg State University, Penn.

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    Jon - Director of the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters

    Head shot photo of Jon Morse What do you do in your job?
    I am the Director of the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. I am responsible for the management of over twenty flight projects including Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, and Fermi as well as future missions like James Webb Space Telescope and WISE. My Division also funds peer-reviewed research to study the origin and evolution of planets, stars and galaxies, including such phenomena as supernovae, neutron stars and black holes.

    What other jobs have you had?
    During my career I have had quite a lot of association with Hubble. In the early 1990’s I worked at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, and from 1997-2003 I was Project Scientist of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph instrument that will be installed on Hubble during SM4. I’ve also used Hubble images and data in many of my research papers on subjects such as star formation, high-mass stars, supernovae and supernova remnants, and active galaxies. While Hubble is and has been a major component of NASA’s astrophysics program, it’s my job to ensure we maintain a fleet of world-class observatories in space to study virtually every aspect of the universe. At the same time, we are working with the scientific community to plan future missions to help unravel the new mysteries now at the forefront of scientific study, such as dark matter and dark energy. I am also interested in space policy.

    Education
    Ph.D. in Astrophysics from the University of North Carolina.

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    Michael - NASA Headquarters HST Program Executive

    Head shot photo of Mike Moore What do you do in your job?
    I am the NASA Headquarters HST Program Executive. I lead all program/project activities for HST at HQ except those dealing with the science content of the mission. I ensure the program is executed according to approved NASA processes and act as the primary interface with the program managers at the Centers to ensure a complete understanding of their status. I also independently assess performance against technical, schedule and budget requirements.

    Who do you work with?
    Together with the HQ Program Scientist, and Program Analyst, we make up the HQ management team for the day-to-day activities of HQ and the Program.

    Education
    B.A. in History from Arkansas Tech University and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

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Hubble Science Careers

    Frank - Astronomer

    Head shot photo of Frank What school subjects do you use at work?
    Almost all of them: Math, Physics, English, History, Chemistry, and the Arts.

    What choices did you make growing up that helped you get to where you are today?
    I did not follow the "standard route" - I decided to make my own path. I tried to be good at many things: intellectual, athletic, and artistic. I spent three years competing in ice dancing after high school, and learned a lot about life and myself before starting college.

    To succeed in academics, the most important choices are not really the big decisions, like where to go to college or graduate school, but rather the small choices you make about working carefully and diligently every day.

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    Carol – Astronomer/Scientist

    Head shot photo of Carol What do you like about your job?
    My job demands creativity and unusual thinking – what is new? How can we do things in a different way? I like to examine things from many perspectives and play with many ideas on a subject.

    If you weren’t in your current position, what would you be?
    A dog day-care owner or a full-time flight instructor.

    What do you do in your free time?
    I love flying, aerobatics, skydiving- this allows me to view the planet from unusual perspectives including in free fall and upside-down. I also enjoy scuba diving, indoor climbing, a myriad of other activities, and dogs (I mean big dogs!)
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    Randy - HST Development Project Scientist

    Head shot photo of Randy Kimble What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Development Project Scientist, responsible for ensuring all new hardware developed for SM4 meets its scientific goals. I am also the Instrument Scientist for the Wide Field Camera 3. The HST Project developed this facility instrument on behalf of the astronomical community and as such has no principal investigator. We have a local science team that is responsible for dealing with day-to-day issues related to the instrument's scientific performance and for carrying out its ground calibration. In addition, an external Science Oversight Committee, chaired by Prof. Robert O'Connell of the University of Virginia, represents the broader community and provides overall guidance regarding scientific matters.

    Education
    BS in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and a Master’s and Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley also in Physics.

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    Malcolm - HST Deputy Senior Project Scientist

    Head shot photo of Malcolm Niedner What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Deputy Senior Project Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and have served in this capacity since 1993. Along with the senior project scientist, I advise and work with the HST Program Office in all the major functional areas, including servicing mission preparation and execution; the development of new science instruments; science operations and on-orbit anomaly resolution; public affairs activities including scientific press release development and review; work closely with colleagues at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore; and am involved in programmatic planning for the future.

    What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    During SM4, I will serve on the management team, staffing a 12-hour ‘orbit shift’ at the Space Telescope Operations Control Center involving the EVAs, or spacewalks.

    Education
    B.A. in Physics from Brown University and an M. A. and a Ph.D. in Astronomy from Indiana University.

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    Ken - HST Operations Project Scientist

    Head shot photo of Ken Carpenter What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Operations Project Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I provide scientific leadership, advice, guidance, and oversight to the Operations Project Manager and staff. I also monitor the in-orbit performance of flight instruments and other spacecraft systems, provide scientific guidance in the assessment and resolution of spacecraft anomalies, support preparations for and execution of HST servicing missions, support the development of future science instruments operations, and oversee current science operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

    What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    During Servicing Mission 4, I will work on the Management Planning Shift in the Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) at Goddard. In this role, I will act as a liaison between the HST Project and the individual science teams, oversee analysis of data from the functional tests performed in-orbit on the new and repaired science instruments and lead the reporting of these results to senior project management, and provide general advice to project management on scientific priorities if trade-offs have to be made during the mission due to unexpected difficulties in servicing the telescope.

    Education
    B.A. and M.A. in Astronomy from Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., and a Ph.D. in Astronomy from The Ohio State University.

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    Eric - NASA Headquarters HST Program Scientist

    Head shot photo of Eric Smith What do you do in your job?
    I am the NASA Headquarters HST Program Scientist. I am responsible for monitoring and managing the science program for HST and ensuring the mission remains viable and true to NASA strategic objectives. I review materials from the project for their scientific validity and alignment with NASA goals and attend status meetings to report findings to upper management. I also devote time to the James Webb Space Telescope as it’s a developing program, and to research and analysis programs for infrared and submillimeter astronomy.

    Education
    B.A. in Physics and Astronomy from the University of Virginia and a M.A. and Ph.D in Astronomy from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    David - HST Senior Project Scientist

    Head shot photo of David Leckrone What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Senior Project Scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I provide scientific leadership for all aspects of the Hubble program, including program management, spacecraft and science operations, development of new scientific instruments and in-orbit servicing. I ensure the scientific requirements for the Hubble program are achieved and that the telescope is scientifically productive and successful over its long lifetime. I serve as a member of the Hubble senior management team, helping plan and guide each servicing mission.

    What is your role in Servicing Mission 4?
    During the mission I sit with our team in the Flight Control Room at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, monitoring how the mission is progressing and participating in discussions of how to respond should a contingency arise.

    Education
    B.S. in Physics from Purdue University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Astronomy from UCLA.

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Hubble Technical Support Careers

    Ann - Astrophysics Designer/Illustrator

    Head shot photo of Ann What do you wish you'd known then that you know now?
    That variety is good, and that it's important to sample many different disciplines before deciding on a career path. It's vital to be flexible and explore new options.

    What do you do in your job?
    I work with scientists and educators to develop content for print and web products. After content is nailed down I design a layout and create graphics for the format needed - e.g., a brochure, Web page, or an explanatory graphic to accompany a press release about Hubble discoveries.

    If you weren't in your current position, what would you be?
    Most likely a children's book illustrator. I may turn my hand to travel and food writing one day.

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    Lisa F. – Astronomical Image Processor

    Head shot photo of Lisa F. What do you like about your job?
    I like working at the Space Telescope Science Institute. As an image processor for the telescope, my work is very presentation-oriented. I have worked on nearly 300 images over the past decade. The images I create are rewriting astronomy picture book and textbooks. My main project, Hubble Heritage, helps bring scientific images to people around the world.

    What do you wish you’d known then?
    I was one of the only women in my field of study in college. Many times I had to prove or justify myself to others, including changing majors to study astronomy. Today, I am a big proponent of encouraging young girls to become interested in science and having our field retain them as young astronomers.

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    Gary - Model Builder

    Head shot photo of Gary What do you do in your job?
    I construct prototype models designed by NASA engineers. The models are built to scale and give a better understanding of what the actual spacecraft will look like. I have received crude sketches on napkins, so I must try and extract ideas out of the engineers' heads to get exactly what they want. Other times, I get full-scale dimensional drawings. I have worked on every project that Goddard Space Flight Center has constructed over 29 years and have met hundreds of people; some are like walking computers - full of information.

    What school subjects do you use at work?
    Math, English, Shop, and Science.

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    Perry - Senior Network Administrator

    Head shot photo of Perry What obstacles did you face growing up and how did you overcome them?
    I was born with sickle cell disease and couldn't do the things other kids did. My parents never tried to discourage me from trying things, so even though I often got sick from doing strenuous activities, my body became somewhat stronger and more developed than other kids with the same disease.

    What do you wish you'd known then that you know now about high school?
    My senior year I got very lazy and playful and for the first time I was no longer on the HonorRoll. I believe now that the 12th grade is the most critical for maintaining grades.

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    Lori - Senior Web Developer

    Head shot photo of Lori What obstacles did you face and how did you overcome them?
    My biggest obstacle was the money (I am still paying student loans!). I wish I had known about a book that lists all available scholarships and how to get them. There would have been less stress if I hadn't had to worry about my finances every semester.

    What do you do in your job?
    I work a lot at my computer, designing, programming, and putting information and pictures on the Web sites for which I am responsible.

    What do you do in your free time?
    I, and several others, work on a race car for a friend. As part of his pit crew, we go to the track when he races and fix anything that needs to be fixed. I also like to read and grow orchids.

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Interactive Hubble Career Poster

     This image depicts the front of the Hubble career poster with people in their work environments. The content of the interactive feature to which this is attached is presented below in text and image form.