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Hubble Engineering and Science Management Careers

    Mike - HST Carrier Development Manager

    Head shot photo of Mike Adams What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Carrier Development Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for the Shuttle’s payload bay hardware which will safely deliver the new instruments, electronics, and tools to orbit during SM4. We ensure these items remain secure during launch and landing, and keep them at the proper temperature while on orbit. I am responsible for four carriers for SM4 – the Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC), the Orbital Replaceable Unit Carrier (ORUC), the Flight Support System (FSS), and the Multi-Use Lightweight Equipment (MULE ) Carrier.

    What is the purpose of the shuttle payload bay hardware?
    These structures carry the instruments, avionics, and tools needed during the servicing mission. I also manage the design, fabrication, and test of new hardware that is integrated into the carriers prior to the servicing mission.

    Education
    B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a M.S in Mechanical Engineering from George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

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    Jackie – Engineer/Instrument Manager

    Head shot photo of Jackie What do you wish you’d known then?
    It’s okay not to know the answer right away. It’s okay to ask teachers for help. It’s okay to risk failure. Never give up on your dream – persistence pays off.

    What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    I call it “The lure of the Meatball” – in reference to the NASA logo. In engineering, there are certainly higher salaries and perks available outside the Government, but for me, a particular pride, professional independence, and technical excellence come along with working directly for NASA. I have an inherent ability to speak my mind and work in line with my technical conscience because I work for NASA, and I wouldn’t trade that for any amount of money.

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    Mark - HST Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Office Manager

    Head shot photo of Mark Jarosz What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Office Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I manage a team that develops EVA procedures, techniques, and tools the astronauts will use to service and repair Hubble. My team trains the astronauts at Goddard and Johnson Space Center using a combination of engineering units, mockups (exact models) and flight hardware. I coordinate and manage all the HST hardware the astronauts practice with at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab water tank as well as provide a team of Scuba divers to support the astronaut EVA crew during underwater training.

    What was your role in prior Hubble servicing missions?
    I served as the Carrier Manager for SM3A and SM3B, responsible for developing and delivering the carrier flight hardware used to transport the Hubble repair instruments, equipment, and tools to orbit aboard the Space Shuttle.

    Education
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering form the University of Alabama, Huntsville.

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    Vince – Financial Manager

    Head shot photo of Vince Your quote/advice to kids?
    No one is in charge of your happiness except you.

    What do you wish you’d known then that you know now about education after high school?
    I wish I knew that most employers won’t interview you without at least a bachelor’s degree. If known, I would have gone to school full time and obtained my degree before entering the workforce. Before I got my degree, I was forced to prove that I could do the job before I was considered for an interview.

    What school subjects do you use at work?
    All mathematics, writing (both technical and constructive), and the most important subject I was forced to take in high school – typing!

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    Hsiao - HST Instrument Development Office Manager

    Head shot photo of Hsiao Smith What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Instrument Development Office Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for providing the new science instruments for SM4 – the Wide Field Camera 3 and Cosmic Origins Spectrograph – along with hardware that will repair the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and Advanced Camera for Surveys on Hubble. I manage the design, fabrication, and test of the two new science instruments and replacement hardware – a collaborative effort involving numerous companies around the country as well as personnel at Goddard.

    Education
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Masters in Engineering Management from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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    Tom - HST Observatory Manager

    Head shot photo of Tom Griffin. What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Observatory Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team designed, developed, fabricated, assembled, tested and is delivering the spacecraft systems and components that astronauts will install on Hubble during SM4, including a refurbished Fine Guidance Sensor, gyroscopes, Electrical Control Units, batteries, New Thermal Blanket Layer (NOBL), Soft Capture and Rendezvous System, Fuse Plugs/Modules, and Latch Over-center kits. We also ensure that all spacecraft systems, science instruments, Space Support Equipment and Crew Aids and Tools are brought together, integrated, tested and verified prior to launch.

    Education
    B.S. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a M.S. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Michigan.

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    Chip – Property Manager

    Head shot photo of Chip What do you do in your job?
    As a property and logistics manager, I ensure that all equipment we use is documented and tracked. I also coordinate the transportation and storage of items such as flight hardware (items and instruments to be flown on orbit or on the Space Shuttle), excess hardware, and computers. If it isn’t nailed down, I’m responsible for it.

    What are the best and worst parts of your job?
    The best part is that I know that what I do makes a difference and I’ll be able to say later on in life that I was part of the Hubble team and NASA. The worst part is commuting 40 miles to work one way.

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    Lynn – Satellite Systems Engineer and Manager

    Head shot photo of Lynn Your quote/advice to kids?
    Diversity, broaden your skills, think about the big picture, work hard, and accept yourself.

    What do you wish you’d known about education after high school?
    My dad was correct when he said that college isn’t about getting high grades….it is really about training your mind so that you can readily go out into a profession with the tools and skills to succeed and/or the drive to continue learning on the job the tools and skills necessary to succeed.

    What do you do in your job?
    I manage the Hubble Flight Operations Team and the procedures they use to command Hubble and monitor it on a 24 hours-a-day, 365 days-a-year basis.

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    Joyce - Senior Systems Manager for HST

    Head shot photo of Joyce King What do you do in your job?
    I am a Senior Systems Manager for HST at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I provide system engineering leadership for all aspects of the Hubble Operations project, including HST operations, life extension and servicing mission activities.

    What is your role for Servicing Mission 4?
    During SM4, I will serve as the Mission Operations Manager (MOM) on the planning shift, responsible for all operations in the STOCC. I coordinate with the Servicing Mission Manager and Systems Manager for all nominal mission operations, contingency operations, and Command Plan/Servicing Mission Integrated Timeline re-plan activities. The MOM is the key interface to the Senior Systems Manager at JSC to provide operational status and coordinate all mission critical activities.

    Education
    B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Haven and a M.S. in Engineering Management from the University of Central Florida.
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    Keith - Servicing Mission Operations Manager

    Head shot photo of Keith Walyus What do you do in your job?
    I am the Servicing Mission Operations Manager in the Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. I am responsible for ensuring my team of about 90 engineers is ready to execute the HST servicing mission. I ensure proper procedures are built to command the telescope, the team is properly trained, and the control center is functioning properly.

    What is your role for Servicing Mission 4?
    During the mission, I will work on console as the Mission Operations Manager (MOM). Each shift will be 12 hours and I will be assigned to the orbit shift, which includes the rendezvous, spacewalks, and deploy of Hubble. The other shift, a 12-hour planning shift, during which any re-planning occurs to make sure our timelines are ready for the next day’s EVAs, or spacewalks, is staffed by Joyce King.

    Education
    B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Houston.

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    Jackie - HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager

    Head shot photo of Jackie What do you do in your job?
    I am the HST Wide Field Camera 3 Instrument Manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. My team is responsible for ensuring that WFC3 meets its technical requirements, is assembled on time, and within cost. I direct several engineers, technicians and scientists working at about 10 major organizations around the country to ensure they deliver the best possible instrument to Hubble.

    What do you wish you’d known then?
    It’s okay not to know the answer right away. It’s okay to ask teachers for help. It’s okay to risk failure. Never give up on your dream – persistence pays off.

    What perks or other tangible benefits do you get?
    I call it “The lure of the Meatball” – in reference to the NASA logo. In engineering, there are certainly higher salaries and perks available outside the Government, but for me, a particular pride, professional independence, and technical excellence come along with working directly for NASA. I have an inherent ability to speak my mind and work in line with my technical conscience because I work for NASA, and I wouldn’t trade that for any amount of money.

    Education
    B.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Interactive Hubble Career Poster

     This image depicts the front of the Hubble career poster with people in their work environments. The content of the interactive feature to which this is attached is presented below in text and image form.

     

Meet the Servicing Mission 4 Team

     Click on the image below to view interactive feature.

    Meet the Hubble Servicing Team